The right tone Performing the national anthems at Ireland and Englands historic

first_img Donncha O’Callaghan, Peter Stringer and Paul O’Connell with tears in his eyes during the national anthem. Image: Dan Sheridan/INPHO http://the42.ie/3249264 By Sinead Farrell Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article ‘The game in Croke Park made normal Ireland-England Tests look like a garden fete’ Android Donncha O’Callaghan, Peter Stringer and Paul O’Connell with tears in his eyes during the national anthem. Click here for more of The42′s Ireland v England anniversary series >PLAYING NATIONAL ANTHEMS before sports events was nothing new for the Army No. 1 Band coming into the 2007 Six Nations campaign.Over the years, they learned to become proficient at performing them in the old arena at Lansdowne Road.It was a familiar space, where the band members would often slip into the seats to watch the game after finishing their performance.But during the reconstruction phases preceding the birth of the Aviva Stadium, the band was redirected to a new setting for their anthem-playing duties — Croke Park.This wasn’t entirely uncharted territory for the group. They had previously deputised for the Artane Band at the stadium in the past.But covering this particular set of Six Nations gigs was about more than just carrying out the anthems in a different stadium. Source: docathail/YouTubeFollowing the amendment of Rule 42, the people of Ireland were conflicted, and finding it difficult to unanimously support the concept of hosting rugby and football games at GAA headquarters.With England lined up to be one of the teams coming to Ireland that year, there were concerns over how a rendition of God Save The Queen would be received.There was still a lingering resonance with the events of Bloody Sunday in 1920, and some pockets of society felt the doors of Croke Park were being prematurely reopened to the British.Mark Armstrong, who was the Army No.1 Band conductor at that time, could appreciate the tension surrounding the fixture.“With a sporting event like Ireland v England, and their old rivalry — a healthy rivalry of course — there was a lot of good sensibilities surrounding it, which maybe people were slightly anxious about, with the anthem being played there,” he told The42. Brian O’Driscoll and John Hayes stand for the national anthems. Source: Dan Sheridan/INPHO“Obviously, we played the British anthem before in Lansdowne Road, but it was the location of Croke Park that was the significant part of it.”Of course, this wasn’t the first Six Nations game to be hosted at the grounds in 2007. Ireland had a home tie with France ahead of the England clash, but Armstrong never gets inquiries about his memories of that fixture.The lack of a deeply-rooted tension between Ireland and France must have dampened the intrigue.But the France game allowed Armstrong, and the rest of the band, to acclimatise to an atmosphere which didn’t manifest in the more compact surroundings of Lansdowne Road.Looking back, because the capacity is around 80,000, the sheer volume of support and the sound was something that we’d never been used to, so it was exceptional from that point of view.“There was huge interest and I suppose the novelty value of rugby being played in Croke Park. There was a different atmosphere altogether, people were so used to the old Lansdowne Road.”The England match took place on 24 February, but neither Armstrong, nor the band members, were worried about any dangerous scenarios occurring in the stadium.The subject of the game and the historical context of it all inevitably came up in conversation, but their focus was solely on the music.We’re there to do a job. It’s a job that we were so used to doing because we play at an awful lot of international sports events. I think there was a heightened awareness of the occasion itself and a great anticipation.“They (the band members) enjoy those occasions as well. There was an awful lot of talk about it between ourselves in the run up to it.”The disapproving minority were present on the day, although they refrained from committing any malicious acts. Protesters standing outside Croke Park. Source: Morgan Treacy/INPHOThe band spotted a few protesters outside the stadium, but the images of those dissenters have all but left Armstrong’s memory of the day.“That’s kind of all been forgotten about because the event was so great. Everybody had so much respect in the stadium.“There was a huge spirit and such good behaviour as well. That particular crowd understood how important it was that everybody respected each other’s traditions. And of course, they went on to have a great rugby match.”The Army band was tasked with performing Amhrán na bhFiann and Ireland’s Call, while the Garda Band was entrusted with delivering God Save The Queen. Standing behind the procession of players on the pitch minutes before kick-off, Armstrong got a full flavour of what was unfolding.He explains how the symbolic nature of the occasion added another layer of responsibility to their assignment.“You’re very aware because you’ve just had the President (Mary McAleese) over to review the two teams lined up. We’re actually behind that, so you know what’s going and we’re all keenly aware of the players too.You’re the musical support for 80,000 people singing the national anthem so it’s a great responsibility and a great honour as well. I felt very proud. It’s a combination of emotions that you really can’t describe.”He added: “I was very interested to see how loudly they would sing because it was a completely different situation. I couldn’t believe the noise that came out of the crowd when they sang God Save The Queen, which would have been the first anthem.“It struck me that everyone in the stadium seemed to be singing along, which of course probably wasn’t true. But somebody said to me afterwards that there was a YouTube video taken up in the stands and there were Irish people signing along as well, so maybe I’m not that far off the mark.”The national anthem has always evoked a powerful emotion in Armstrong. From his early days of conducting the band, he felt a profound response to the songs that represent our national identity and heritage.I remember the very first time I walked as a young band conductor onto Lansdowne Road. The first thing that hit me was the colour of the grass, it’s so green.“And then of course, you’re playing the national anthem, you’re in the middle of the pitch, and you’re hearing all of this sound coming in around you.”Over time, he developed an understanding of how to pace the song so that spectators can enjoy the experience in full voice. And he applies that method every time he conducts the band, regardless of the name above the stadium.“I discovered there was a certain tempo to play the national anthem at, which allowed the crowd to keep up. There’s a pause at the very end of the national anthem, and if you keep going too fast, you lose everybody.“I remember the first time I did it and I was hugely proud to be there. My father was alive at the time and he was a great rugby fan so he was delighted to see me doing that.”Subscribe to The42 Rugby Show podcast here: Share81 Tweet Email Short URL Image: Dan Sheridan/INPHO 20 Comments iTunes The right tone: Performing the national anthems at Ireland and England’s historic 2007 match Many people in Ireland worried about how the Croke Park crowd would react to ‘God Save The Queen.’ 19,460 Views Tuesday 21 Feb 2017, 9:30 PM Feb 21st 2017, 9:30 PM last_img read more

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A farmer would have to travel 11 miles to get to the

first_img 11,596 Views A LETTER HAS been delivered to the Taoiseach calling on him to demand a special status for the North in upcoming Brexit talks.EU leaders hold a summit on Saturday to discuss the next steps in the Brexit process. While British Prime Minister Theresa May will not be invited, Enda Kenny will.At a protest outside his offices yesterday, around 100 people from border communities called on Kenny to argue that the North, which voted against Brexit, should be allowed stay in the EU.JJ O’Hara of Border Communities Against Brexit told TheJournal.ie that the prospect of a customs border on any of the 277 border crossings would be disastrous for the region.“Any border, be it hard or soft, will be detrimental to trade, agriculture and tourism. A lot of people talk about this problem, but we need a solution.”His colleague Bernard O’Boyle said that many farmers were fearful as they have land that straddles the border.“I know a farmer who would have to travel 11 miles to get to the other side of his land if there was a hard border.”Sinn Féin TD Louise O’Reilly accused the government of “sleepwalking Ireland into a hard border”.“As someone who lived in a border town for 10 years, I saw the impact it had on people and on trade. It was very negative and nobody wants to see a return to a hard border. Wednesday 26 Apr 2017, 6:04 AM Share16 Tweet Email There is a disconnect between how Brexit is discussed and the people on the border. You only have to listen to the Taoiseach and the way he talks to know that he hasn’t walked the border and he’s not listening to the people.“These people wouldn’t be here if they thought they were being listened to.”Read: Who owns Rockall? The history of the Atlantic dispute between Ireland and the UKRead: Jeremy Corbyn vows to introduce four new public holidays in UK Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 43 Comments As the clock ticks down, get all the best Brexit news and analysis in your inbox: Apr 26th 2017, 6:04 AM Short URL http://jrnl.ie/3357043 By Paul Hosford ‘A farmer would have to travel 11 miles to get to the other side of his land’ – Border communities fear Brexit EU leaders hold a summit on Saturday to discuss the next steps.last_img read more

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Fear of protester violence stopped US hardright pundit Ann Coulter speaking at

first_imgEfforts by the university to cancel or delay the event dealt a blow to Berkeley’s image as a bastion of tolerance and free speech.Chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks sent a letter to the campus Wednesday saying the university is committed to defending free speech but also to protecting its students.“This is a university, not a battlefield,” Dirks said in the letter. “The university has two non-negotiable commitments, one to Free Speech the other to the safety of our campus community.”Berkeley’s reputation as one of the country’s most liberal universities, in one of America’s most liberal cities, has made it a flashpoint for the nation’s political divisions in the era of Donald Trump.Earlier this month, a bloody brawl broke out in downtown Berkeley at a pro-Trump protest that featured speeches by members of the white nationalist right. They clashed with a group of Trump critics who called themselves anti-fascists.ClashesSimilar violent clashes also erupted at the same site, a public park, on 4 March.In February, violent protesters forced the cancellation of a speech by right-wing writer Milo Yiannopoulos, who like Coulter was invited by campus Republicans. Police at Berkeley ahead of the planned visit of Milo Yiannopoulos in February. Source: Ben Margot?PA ImagesThe Berkeley College Republicans and the Young America’s Foundation, a conservative group that had helped book Coulter’s campus speaking events, both pulled their support Tuesday citing fears of violence. They blamed the university for failing to ensure protection of conservative speakers.“Berkeley College Republicans do not want to endanger people’s lives so because of the university’s unwillingness to do their job we are forced to cancel the event,” Troy Worden, president of the campus Republicans, said Wednesday.Capt. Alex Yao of the Berkley campus police force said police presence will be strong Thursday.“You will see a high number of highly visible law enforcement. We’re going to have a very, very low tolerance for any violence,” he told a news conference. He said Berkeley police had reached out to local and state police forces “to let them know we might be calling for assistance.”- With reporting by Rónán DuffyRead: Right-wing commentator Milo Yiannopoulos at centre of storm over ‘child abuse’ comments >Read: A speech by a famed alt-right activist at Berkeley was cancelled after violent protests last night > 165 Comments Fear of protester violence stopped US hard-right pundit Ann Coulter speaking at Berkeley Ann Coulter described it as a “dark day for free speech”. Source: Fox News/YouTubeThe American Civil Liberties Union has come out against what it said was effectively a veto of Coulter’s right to free speech.“The unacceptable threats of violence that have led to the ‘hecklers’ veto’ of Ann Coulter’s speech at Berkeley are inconsistent with free speech principles that protect us all from government overreach,” said the ACLU’s David Cole.Hateful speech has consequences, particularly for people of colour, LGBTQ people, immigrants, and others who have been historically marginalised. But if the government gets to decide which speech counts as hate speech, the powers that be may later feel free to censor any speech they don’t like.“For the future of our democracy, we must protect bigoted speech from government censorship. On college campuses, that means that the best way to combat hateful speech is through counter-speech, vigorous and creative protest, and debate, not threats of violence or censorship,” Cole added,Officials at UC Berkeley said last week they feared renewed violence on campus if Coulter followed through with plans to speak. They cited “very specific intelligence” of threats that could endanger Coulter and students, as Berkeley becomes a platform for extremist protesters on both sides of the political spectrum. Source: Ann Coulter/Twitter https://jrnl.ie/3360610 I thought I might stroll around the graveyard of the First Amendment. Ann Coulter at a conservative conference in Washington in 2011. Ann Coulter at a conservative conference in Washington in 2011. Image: Cliff Owen/PA Images Share78 Tweet Email1 Image: Cliff Owen/PA Images CONTROVERSIAL US PUNDIT Ann Coulter has said that she was forced to cancel her speaking event at the University of California, Berkeley today.It comes amid concerns of violence by protesters who objected to her appearance at the university.Police and university officials said they were bracing for possible trouble whether Coulter comes to campus or not, citing intelligence and online chatter by groups threatening to instigate violence.Coulter is a hard-right, best-selling author who has been regularly accused of racism and who was a vocal supporter of Donald Trump during his campaign.The Telegraph last year referred to her as “the Katie Hopkins of America”.In emails to The Associated Press, Coulter confirmed that her planned speech on illegal immigration, followed by a question-answer session, was cancelled. But she remained coy about what she might do instead.“I’m not speaking. But I’m going to be near there, so I might swing by to say hello to my supporters who have flown in from all around the country,” Coulter said in an email. By Associated Press Thursday 27 Apr 2017, 7:38 AM Apr 27th 2017, 7:38 AM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 14,428 Views Short URL I’m very sad about Berkeley’s cancelation, but my sadness is greater than that. It is a dark day for free speech in America.— Ann Coulter (@AnnCoulter) April 26, 2017last_img read more

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Two Connacht players narrowly escape axe attack at Dusseldorfs main train station

first_img Share Tweet Email Mar 9th 2017, 11:53 PM Thursday 9 Mar 2017, 11:53 PM Short URL Heenan could see stretchers inside the train station. “We left the station to get food”, Heenan told The42. We can’t have been gone more than an hour and got back to that. The station and everything near it was on lockdown – police and helicopters everywhere. We saw loads of police under a bridge with the road closed off. Then we saw the station and just asked people what had happened. There was a reporter taking photos who let us know. Fortunately, we didn’t get any closer than that. We could just see all the police and people on stretchers inside the station”.Heenan and Robinson-McCoy returned to their hotel, situated a couple of kilometres away, on foot and saw a litany of emergency service vehicles on their way to the scene. Source: ebenedict1986/YouTube“On the whole walk him, there were police, fire trucks and ambulances racing through the streets. Locals were a mixture of upset, emotional and confused – a lot of people were wondering what was going on”.One man was arrested, police said, correcting earlier police reports of two arrests.Five injured in axe attack at Dusseldorf’s main train station in Germany 32 Comments http://the42.ie/3279975 center_img 38,703 Views TWO CONNACHT RUGBY players narrowly escaped the axe attack that occurred at Dusseldorf’s main train station earlier tonight and which left five people injured.Jake Heenan and Dominic Robertson-McCoy had been in Germany to watch Wednesday night’s Champions League game between Borussia Dortmund and Benfica and were preparing to travel back to Ireland via Dusseldorf on Friday.They planned on spending Thursday night in the city and headed towards the Central Station earlier this evening to do some sight-seeing. By Eoin O’Callaghan Two Connacht players narrowly escape axe attack at Dusseldorf’s main train station Jake Heenan and Dominic Robertson-McCoy were in the German city tonight. Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Thousands of US troops could be headed for Afghanistan after Trump decision

first_img Image: Brian Harris/AP Photo Jun 14th 2017, 7:33 AM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 19,139 Views 40 Comments Wednesday 14 Jun 2017, 7:33 AM Under Barack Obama, troop levels in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria were closely managed by the White House. Thousands of US troops could be headed for Afghanistan after Trump decision By AFP http://jrnl.ie/3442897 A U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter crew chief assigned to Task Force Griffin, 16th Combat Aviation Brigade in Kunduz. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP has granted the Pentagon authority to set troop levels in Afghanistan, a US official said last night, a move that could lead to the deployment of thousands more soldiers.Speaking on condition of anonymity, the official told AFP that Pentagon chief Jim Mattis can now directly adjust troop numbers, though the official would not confirm whether a new “force management level” — currently at around 8,400 — had been finalised.“The White House has done the same that it did with Iraq and Syria, which is to grant the secretary of defense the authority to set troop levels,” the official said, referring to recent adjustments Trump has approved for the fight against the Islamic State group in those two countries.Under Barack Obama, troop levels in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria were closely managed by the White House and commanders complained they felt shackled by the strictures.The development came just hours after Mattis gave lengthy testimony to lawmakers, some of whom were exasperated at how long it has taken for Trump to come up with a new strategy in Afghanistan.The official said the final decision to give Mattis the power to adjust troop levels actually came during his testimony, at which he said America still is “not winning” in Afghanistan.The “Taliban had a good year last year, they are trying to have a good one this year,” Mattis told the Senate Armed Services Committee at a hearing about the Pentagon’s budget.“Right now, I believe the enemy is surging.”InvasionMattis’s latest assessment comes nearly 16 years after the US-led invasion of Afghanistan and amid a war that continues to claim the lives of US troops each year — and those of thousands of local forces and civilians.US military commanders, who saw fragile security gains eroded under Obama-era troop drawdowns, have been pushing for a new strategy that could see thousands of additional soldiers deploy to Afghanistan to help train and advise beleaguered Afghan partners.Media reports have said Mattis is considering asking for 3,000 to 5,000 additional US and NATO troops, but the defense chief has said little on the matter.In February, General John Nicholson, who commands NATO forces in Afghanistan, warned that he needs “a few thousand” more troops to reverse what he called a stalemate.Despite months of expectation that a full Afghanistan strategy announcement is imminent, Mattis said the new plans not be ready before mid-July.Republican Senator John McCain, who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee, voiced his “palpable” frustration.“We’re now six months into this administration, we still haven’t got a strategy for Afghanistan,” McCain said, noting it was difficult to get behind an Afghanistan budget request without knowing what the plan is.“We know what the strategy was for the last eight years: Don’t lose. That hasn’t worked.”Mattis acknowledged the reality on the ground.“We are not winning in Afghanistan right now. We will correct this as soon as possible,” he said.- © AFP 2017Read: At least 30 injured as massive fire engulfs west London tower block A U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter crew chief assigned to Task Force Griffin, 16th Combat Aviation Brigade in Kunduz. Image: Brian Harris/AP Photo Short URL Share19 Tweet Email1 last_img read more

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The 5 at 5 Thursday

first_img Source: Shutterstock/margostockEVERY WEEKDAY EVENING, TheJournal.ie brings you the five biggest stories of the day.1. #WICKLOW MOUNTAINS: A man has been charged with the murder of Dublin woman Patricia O’Connor, whose remains were recovered from a number of sites in the Wicklow Mountains.2. #GRENFELL TOWER: The number of fatalities from the London tower block fire has risen to 17, with Prime Minister Theresa May ordering a full inquiry.3. #GRAHAM DWYER: The convicted murderer has taken his case to the High Court regarding the use of mobile phone records in his trial.4. #BLACKSPOT: There are 79 unemployment blackspots in Ireland, with Co Limerick the worst affected.5. #OBSTRUCTION: US President Donald Trump is being investigated for possible obstruction of justice.Comments are closed for legal reasons 6,818 Views Thursday 15 Jun 2017, 4:57 PM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Short URL Jun 15th 2017, 4:57 PM http://jrnl.ie/3445909 Share1 Tweet Email No Comments The 5 at 5: Thursday Five minutes, five stories, five o’clock… By Cianan Brennanlast_img read more

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Irish farmers warned about Bluetongue virus after outbreaks in France

first_img Short URL Image: sheep image via Shutterstock 9 Comments Share19 Tweet Email5 Irish farmers warned about Bluetongue virus after outbreaks in France There have been 657 reported outbreaks in France since the start of this year. Jun 24th 2017, 10:51 AM Image: sheep image via Shutterstock Saturday 24 Jun 2017, 10:51 AM http://jrnl.ie/3461839 10,296 Views Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article By Michelle Hennessy THE DEPARTMENT OF Agriculture has warned Irish farmers about Bluetongue virus after a high number of outbreaks in France in recent years.Bluetongue is a viral disease of animals like cattle, sheep, goats and deer and it primarily transmitted by midges. Signs of the virus in an animal include a swollen face or swollen udders in a cow and nasal discharge, though there may be no signs at all.In 2015 France reported the re-emergence of this virus in sheep and cattle and as of 16 June this year, there have been more than 2,000 reported outbreaks in the country, with 657 of those occurring since January 2017.This week the department issued advice to farmers and urged them to be vigilant and ensure they are fully aware of the presenting clinical signs. They are also advised to report any suspicion of disease to their Regional Veterinary Office (RVO) without delay.The department said particular care should be taken when importing animals from affected countries in the EU.last_img read more

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Dublin man leading Concern team as they tackle major Ebola outbreak in

first_img 13,413 Views A DUBLIN MAN is leading a Concern Worldwide team as they work to contain a major Ebola outbreak that has so far infected 840 people and killed 537 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).The number of Ebola deaths in the country has risen by 45% since the start of the year from 370 on 2 January to 537 on 17 February. At least 22 of the dead are health workers. As the lethal virus continues to spread in North Kivu in the north-east of the country, €100,000 in emergency response funding from Irish Aid, the government’s international aid programme, has helped Concern escalate hits response to the crisis. Concern has 180 staff in DRC, where the NGO has worked since 1994. Their Ebola response to this outbreak, which began last August, is being led by area coordinator Mark Johnson (33) from Goatstown, Dublin.  “Our current Irish Aid programme aims to prevent the outbreak from spreading southwards towards the big city of Goma and also across the border to Rwanda by supporting health centres and sensitising communities to the disease,” Johnson said. His team are using the Irish Aid funding to train over 350 health workers in how to control the outbreaks as it nears Goma, which has a population of over one million. They are also equipping local health centres with infection prevention and control kits that contain items like masks, gloves, disinfection equipment and non-touch thermometers. The team are distributing the kits in coordination with the DRC Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO), which is leading the overall response to the outbreak. In recent weeks, Concern also repaired 15 water points in Beni city, close to the outbreak’s epicentre, to ensure people have access to safe drinking water, which is essential for disease control.Concern’s Regional Director for Francophone Africa, Reka Sztopa said: “This is the second biggest Ebola outbreak in history and the biggest ever in DRC.“Insecurity and the lack of access to the worst affected areas are the main reasons why this outbreak has not come under control already. There are many different armed groups in eastern Congo so this makes it very hard to reach those affected,” Sztopa said. Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article By Hayley Halpin Share5 Tweet Email3 We must remember that Ebola can quickly infect and kill entire families and decimate communities through simple forms of human contact with someone who is acutely ill with the disease.Notorious diseaseEbola is one of the world’s most notorious diseases, being both highly infectious and extremely lethal.It is caused by a virus that has a natural reservoir in the bat, which does not itself fall ill, but can pass the microbe on to humans who hunt it for “bushmeat”.The virus is handed on by contact with bodily fluids – touching a sick or dead person is a well-known source of infection.Following an incubation period of between two and 21 days, Ebola develops into a high fever, weakness, intense muscle and joint pain, headaches and a sore throat.That is often followed by vomiting and diarrhoea, skin eruptions, kidney and liver failure, and internal and external bleeding.The latest outbreak in DRC is the 10th such outbreak in the country since the disease was first detected there in 1976. Concern Worldwide has reached almost 62,000 people since the start of the outbreak last August. The WHO has also stepped up its warning of the potential risk of Ebola cases spreading to other parts of the DRC and into neighbouring countries due to people travelling between the affected areas, and insecurity in the region. The DRC, which is 27 times the size of Ireland with a population of over 85.2 million, is also currently experiencing other epidemics such as cholera and malaria. With reporting by © AFP 2019 Mark Johnson Image: Concern Image: Concern 15 Comments Mark Johnson Feb 24th 2019, 8:01 AM Dublin man leading Concern team as they tackle major Ebola outbreak in DR Congo The latest outbreak has so far infected 840 people and killed 537 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. https://jrnl.ie/4505721 Short URL Sunday 24 Feb 2019, 8:00 AMlast_img read more

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The 9 at 9 Monday

first_img 9,838 Views Share2 Tweet Email Monday 25 Feb 2019, 7:59 AM Image: Shutterstock/Tatiana Bralnina Image: Shutterstock/Tatiana Bralnina No Comments https://jrnl.ie/4511412 The 9 at 9: Monday Here’s the news as you start your day. By Stephen McDermott EVERY MORNING TheJournal.ie brings you all the news you need to know as you start the day.1. #BREXIT Leo Varadkar will meet Theresa May at the first EU-Arab summit in Egypt this morning, amid rumours that the British Prime Minister could delay Brexit beyond March.2. #OSCARS It was an evening of surprises at the 91st Academy Awards last night, with Green Book, Bohemian Rhapsody and Roma the big winners in Los Angeles.3. #GANGLAND Children as young as 13 are becoming involved in the Kinahan/Hutch feud, TheJournal.ie has learned.4. #FATAL RTC A teenager killed in a single-vehicle collision in Co Carlow has been named locally as Eamon Kavanagh.5. #INQUEST An inquest into the 1974 IRA pub bombing that killed 21 people in Birmingham will begin today, RTÉ reports.6. #JOB SHARING The Department of Education intends to tackle teacher shortages by hiring for roles that will be shared between secondary schools.7. #BAD LANGUAGE Met Éireann staff have been told not to talk in terms of “despair” and to use positive language when discussing climate change.8. #EXTRA MARKS A Fine Gael Senator is proposing to change the CAO applications system to award points for social and athletic involvement.   9. #WEATHER It’s set to be a warm start to the week, with dry conditions and temperatures hitting 17 degrees in parts of the country today. Short URL Feb 25th 2019, 7:59 AM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Sexton leads critics of outoftouch proposal for new 12team World Rugby tournament

first_imgSexton leads critics of ‘out-of-touch’ proposal for new 12-team World Rugby tournament There was no place for Fiji, Samoa or Tonga in the proposed tournament, with emerging TV markets Japan and USA preferred. Image: Dan Sheridan/INPHO By Sean Farrell Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Share136 Tweet Email2 50 Comments Subscribe https://the42.ie/4516923 Short URL To suggest that players can play five incredibly high-level test matches in consecutive weeks in November is out of touch and shows little understanding of the physical strain this brings”The proposal would see the Six Nations and Rugby Championship continue in their current guise – albeit with USA and Japan added to the southern hemisphere competition – while November and summer Tests would be enveloped into the new tournament.That summer window would see traditional Test series replaced by hectic travel schedules for northern hemisphere teams playing three different opponents in the southern hemisphere. Jacob Stockdale playing in Tokyo in 2017. Ireland could face regular long-haul flights to fulfill the proposed fixtures. Source: Ryan Byrne/INPHOAmong Pacific island nations, the worry is that their 12-year shut-out will lead to further player exodus. Not just from Fiji, Samoa and Tonga, but perhaps even from rugby union itself.“There are 18-year-old young Samoans, Tongans and Fijians now who will now be looking at ‘who do I make myself eligible for,’” warns chief executive of Pacific Rugby Players, Aayden Clarke in an interview with Stuff.co.nz this morning,“Because if I play for my home country I will never play in the bright lights of Twickenham and possibly will never have the opportunity to play the All Blacks or Australia.”Clarke adds: “I’ve been in discussions with the three (Pacific nation) CEOs last night and we talked about the impact of this and one of them straight out said that ‘this will be death of Pacific Island Rugby’ and another discussion indicated that ‘we might as well start playing league’.”The new tournament reportedly has backing from a broadcaster, whose support could bring annual revenues of up to €8.5 million for each nation. Campese Maafu runs at Devin Toner during a 2017 Test. Source: Oisin Keniry/INPHOWith international rugby likely to be pushed outside the current Test window by the plan, the players’ association also highlighted the uncertainty over the impact on Lions tours, the World Cup and the club game.“Players are definitely open to discussing a new global season,” says England captain Owen Farrell, “but what we develop has to work with the club game in order to reduce conflict, deal with player release issues and make sure their welfare is looked after. “The proposal presented to us at the moment doesn’t seem to have considered this properly and shows no signs of improving this already difficult situation.”New Zealand’s Kieran Read added:“We need to be very careful that we balance the commercial needs of the game, with the player welfare needs and ensure the quality and integrity of matches meets expectations.“Fans want to see meaningful games; they don’t want to see fatigued players playing a reduced quality of rugby as part of a money-driven, weakened competition that doesn’t work for the players or clubs.”Bernard Jackman joins Murray Kinsella and Gavan Casey to discuss the backlash to World Rugby’s league proposal, captaincy styles, sports psychology and more in The42 Rugby Weekly. Thursday 28 Feb 2019, 8:27 AM Sexton at a meeting of the Players’ Council in November. Source: The42 Rugby Weekly/SoundCloudSubscribe to our new podcast, The42 Rugby Weekly, here: IRELAND OUT-HALF Jonathan Sexton is among those citing major concerns over a proposed 12-team World Rugby tournament which could launch as early as next year.A report overnight from the New Zealand Herald detailed the 12-team tournament, which would be made up of Japan, USA and the current sides involved in the Six Nations and Rugby Championship.All teams would play each other once during a regular season. With no relegation in the reported proposal, the 12-year term would keep the Pacific rugby nations of Fiji, Samoa and Tonga out of the reckoning.“While players gave this idea a cautious welcome when we met at the end of last year,” says Sexton, who is president of the International Rugby Players’ Council.“It now seems like a commercial deal on the future of the game is being negotiated at a rapid pace with little consideration given to the important points we raised with World Rugby in November.“The issue of player load has never been so topical, however it needs to be properly understood.”Among Sexton’s chief concerns following a Tuesday night conference call between 40 players is the mooted culmination of the annual tournament, which would see semi-finals and finals take place after the three closing rounds of November fixtures. Feb 28th 2019, 8:27 AM Sexton at a meeting of the Players’ Council in November. Image: Dan Sheridan/INPHO 50,583 Views last_img read more

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Spiralling costs scarce materials and penalties How Brexit could impact the housing

first_img As the clock ticks down, get all the best Brexit news and analysis in your inbox: Share43 Tweet Email2 https://jrnl.ie/4524909 By Rónán Duffy 27 Comments Mar 6th 2019, 12:03 AM Image: Eamonn Farrell/RollingNews.ie Wednesday 6 Mar 2019, 12:02 AM Delays in the delivery of materials also has potential to lead to penalties and additional costs that contractors and their sub-contractors could struggle to address.“With house building so tenuous outside the greater Dublin area, even minimal Brexit-driven increases could be the difference between securing development finance or otherwise,” Parlon added.In further CIF warnings that accompanied the survey, the importance of the building sector in dealing with Ireland’s housing crisis is stressed and it is noted that it is critical that the industry is “both Brexit ready and proof”.As well as the potential problems thrown up by an increase in costs, the CIF has also warned that Brexit could pose a problem in the access to skilled workers.The survey of members found that just under a quarter feared problems in assessing the required talent after Brexit.“A reduction, however limited, in an already small pool of skilled workers, will cause huge strain in an industry with a decade-long pipeline of activity,” the report states.Business group Ibec said in January that between 80,000-100,000 workers would be needed to meet government construction targets and estimated that there is a shortfall of between 60,000 to 80,000.Ibec suggested that there would need to be a significant growth in the number of non-Irish construction workers coming here to bridge that gap.In its report, CIF said it did not envisage an influx of construction workers coming from the UK post-Brexit and that an increased demand for workers “will intensify the war for labour and talent in the sector”.center_img The building sector is being urged to be Brexit ready. Image: Eamonn Farrell/RollingNews.ie Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article RESEARCH BY THE Construction Industry Federation (CIF) has raised concerns that Brexit could hamper the response to the housing crisis by making construction more expensive.The survey gauged the Brexit preparation of CIF members and found significant concern about spiralling costs in both the supply chain and in penalties due to Brexit induced delays.It found that 42% believed that Brexit will have an immediate negative impact on their businesses.“In the immediate term post-Brexit, the supply-chain will be extremely challenged to absorb costs and many companies have already been struggling with increasing input and labour costs in the industry with minimal cost recovery,” CIF director general Tom Parlon said in a message to members. 15,614 Views Spiralling costs, scarce materials and penalties: How Brexit could impact the housing crisis Increased costs and problems securing staff could hinder the industry’s response. Short URL The building sector is being urged to be Brexit ready.last_img read more

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Man charged over multivehicle crash on Australias M4 in which Irishman died

first_img No Comments Short URL Star-shaped intersection of Australian motorways M4 and M7 in Sydney West. May 11th 2019, 1:45 PM By Gráinne Ní Aodha Star-shaped intersection of Australian motorways M4 and M7 in Sydney West. Image: Shutterstock/Taras Vyshnya 21,241 Views Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlecenter_img Saturday 11 May 2019, 1:45 PM https://jrnl.ie/4629993 A MAN WILL appear in court today charged over a motorway crash in Australia in which an Irishman was killed.The collision, which took place on Thursday morning, involved a lorry and 10 other vehicles on the M4 highway, in the Mays Hill area of Sydney. Emergency services were called to the Church Street off-ramp about 5.50am (Australian time). Officers from Cumberland Police Area Command arrived to find 11 vehicles stopped at the crash site.A 36-year-old Irishman was pronounced dead at the scene; police said his vehicle was struck by a truck. He’s been named as tradesman Francis Shanley by Australian media.Witnesses told officers the driver of another vehicle – reported to be a Toyota Echo – allegedly left the scene before speaking with police.Following inquiries by officers from the Metropolitan Crash Investigation Unit, a 53-year-old man was arrested after attending St Marys Police Station about 6.15pm on Friday.Police will allege the driver of the Toyota Echo had changed lanes on the M4 then stopped, with multiple collisions occurring as a consequence.The driver of the Echo was taken to Penrith Police Station where he was charged with dangerous driving occasioning death/drive manner dangerous, negligent driving occasioning death, fail to stop and assist after vehicle impact causing death, and two counts of cause bodily harm by misconduct.The man, from Ropes Crossing, was refused bail to appear at Parramatta Bail Court today.Comments have been closed as a man has been charged. Image: Shutterstock/Taras Vyshnya Man charged over multi-vehicle crash on Australia’s M4 in which Irishman died The Irishman has been named in Australian media as 36-year-old Francis Shanley. Share1 Tweet Email1 last_img read more

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39 people died in workplace incidents last year with 17 deaths caused

first_img39 people died in workplace incidents last year, with 17 deaths caused by vehicles The HSA launched it annual report for 2018 today. A TOTAL OF 39 people died from workplace accidents last year, with 17 of those as a result of vehicles.Last year saw a drop of almost 20% in terms of workplace deaths when compared to 2017, when 48 people died, according to the annual report of the Health and Safety Authority (HSA). The farming sector had the biggest share of deaths, with 15 people dying in work-related incidents last year. Five people died while working in construction. Tractors were involved in the deaths of six people, while cars, refuse trucks and forklifts were also involved in fatalities.The HSA also finished 15 prosecutions last year, resulting in total fines of €705,972.Junior Minister for Trade Pat Breen welcomed the reduction in deaths, but said that each life lost caused great trauma and personal suffering for families every year“We should remember that any improvement in numbers provides little comfort to the family, friends and colleagues of the dozens of Irish people whose lives were cut short this year while doing their job,” he said. HSA CEO Dr Sharon McGuinness warned that vehicles were the greatest threat to people in the Irish workplace. “Whether it’s a farmer driving a tractor in a yard, or a truck driver delivering a load, across all sectors, incidents involving vehicles accounted for almost half – or 44% – of all deaths last year,” she said. Friday 30 Aug 2019, 1:09 PM Aug 30th 2019, 1:09 PM Tractors were involved in six workplace deaths last year. Image: Shutterstock/Aleksandar Malivuk The worrying trend is continuing with six deaths provisionally recorded so far this year in the transportation sector. 11 Comments Share5 Tweet Email2 8,438 Views https://jrnl.ie/4788966 Image: Shutterstock/Aleksandar Malivuk By Cormac Fitzgerald Short URL Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Tractors were involved in six workplace deaths last year. last_img read more

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Indias space agency says it lost contact with spacecraft minutes before planned

first_img Sep 7th 2019, 11:46 AM #Chandrayaan2 #ISRO #vikramPragyanLandsMoon PM Narendra Modi consoles an emotional ISRO – Indian Space Research Organisation Chairman K. Sivan pic.twitter.com/dQo09fvtDw— Alok jayswal (@AlokJayswal25) September 7, 2019 20,200 Views Share7 Tweet Email2 “Ups and downs keep coming in life. Your hard work has taught us a lot and the entire country is proud of you,” he added.“If the communication (with the lander) starts again… hope for the best… Our journey will carry on. Be strong. I am with you.”Before the landing, the ISRO acknowledged that it was a complex manoeuvre, with Sivan calling it “15 minutes of terror”.- © AFP 2019 Image: Twitter/ISRO https://jrnl.ie/4799822 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 54 Comments center_img Image: Twitter/ISRO Short URL By Conor McCrave Source: Alok jayswal/Twitter INDIA’S HOPES TO land on the moon have been dashed after its national space agency said it lost contact with a spacecraft just minutes before landing. India had hope to become the fourth country after the US, Russia and China, to successfully land on the moon. The country also aimed to be the first to land in the Southern Polar region, an area the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said was “completely unexplored”.“The Vikram lander descent was [going] as planned and normal performance was observed,” ISRO chairman Kailasavadivoo Sivan said in the control room at the southern city of Bangalore.“Subsequently the communication from lander to ground station was lost. The data is being analysed,” he said.Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who travelled to the Bangalore space centre to watch the landing, told scientists after Sivan’s announcement that “what you have done [already] is not a small achievement”. Saturday 7 Sep 2019, 11:46 AM India’s space agency says it lost contact with spacecraft minutes before planned moon landing The country aimed to be the first to land in the Southern Polar region.last_img read more

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Theophanous lawyer slams chief investigator

first_imgThe defence attorney of Theo Theophanous has slammed the conduct of the investigation by the leading police detective. Robert Richter, QC, was giving his closing submission on Thursday saying that “[…]this investigation and prosecution does a great disservice to all victims of rape and there are many, many real victims of rape.” “Mr Smith’s investigation in my submission gives a bad name to dedicated and hard working sexual offence investigators,” Mr Richter said referring to the chief investigator in the case against the embattled MP. Mr Theophanous is accused by a woman that he raped her in his Parliament office more than ten years ago. His defence lawyer argued that the police had helped the alleged victim modify her testimony several times in order to mirror the evidence that became available during the investigation. “I would put to you that your investigation was a complete disgrace,” Mr Richter said to Detective Sergeant Doug Smith while questioning him on the stand. “I wouldn’t say that,” replied Sergeant Smith. During his testimony the detective claimed that friends of the alleded victim who disputed her claims were not reliable witnesses, while testifying in the committal hearing taking place at the Melbourne Magistrates Court. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Mirabella secures another job

first_imgFormer Indi Liberal MP Sophie Mirabella is joining the University of Melbourne as a public policy fellow. It is the second job that she is going to hold, after the federal government’s announcement last December that she would be joining the Board of the government owned naval defense company ASC Pty Ltd, formerly known as Australian Submarine Corporation.The University of Melbourne states Ms Mirabella’s role as a public policy fellow will require her assisting students, delivering lectures and organising public policy seminars and forums. Ms Mirabella studied law and commerce at the university in the 1980s and is a former President of the Melbourne University Liberal Club and Vice-President of the Australian Liberal Students’ Federation.“I hope to be able to impart some real-life experience about politics,” she said in a statement, where she expressed her satisfaction for her new job.Professor Adrian Little, head of the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne has welcomed the development stating that “Sophie’s experience in public policy and deep understanding of politics will be invaluable.” he said.Melbourne University has only one other public policy fellow, namely Nicholas Reece, a former senior adviser to Victorian Premiers Steve Bracks and John Brumby and to labor Prime Minister Julia Gillard.Sophie Mirabella, a close ally of Prime minister Tony Abbott, was formerly the Coalitions spokeswoman for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, and would have been a cabinet minister had she been elected last September.Her part time appointment is to be taken up immediately.Source: ABC, Fairfax Media Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Man charged for biting Zervas nose off

first_imgPolice have charged a man who allegedly bit the nose off Hells Angels bikie member Peter Zervas in Sydney’s inner-western suburbs this week.Officers arrested a 28-year-old man. He was charged with affray and causing grievous bodily harm. He was refused bail and he was to appear in a Local Court.Peter Zervas is the brother of Anthony Zervas, who was killed in the Sydney Airport bikie brawl in 2009.He survived being shot six times in the car park of his home at Lakemba in 2009, only a week after his brother’s killing.Mr Zervas had surgery earlier this week to reattach part of his nose.Source: ABC Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img

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16 years jail for Oakleigh crash killer

first_imgThe man high on ice who smashed into a car and a pedestrian fatally killing three in Oakleigh has been sentenced to 16 years jail.Nei Lima Da Costa, 29, pleaded guilty to three counts of culpable driving causing death and several other charges including negligently causing injury and recklessly causing injury.Two of the dead were Savvas, 67, and his wife of 38 years, Ismini Menelaou, 59, who were returning from a wedding in January before Da Costa crashed into their sedan. Three other family members, including their son Menelaos, his uncle and aunt, Elias, 60, and Maria Mesaritis, 55, were all seriously injured.Savvas and Ismini’s son Jim Menelaou spoke to the media outside the court, and said no jail sentence would change what had happened or bring his parents back. He said the case was proof that it was time politicians did something about ice addicts.“A lot of red tape prohibits the government or the courts from setting examples, setting a serious sentence,” Mr Menelaou said.He said no example to ice addicts had been set by the judge in this case.Da Costa was seen driving erratically before the incident, and ran through a red light before coming to a stop after smashing into the Menelaou’s sedan at more than 120 kilometres per hour.Justice Lex Lasry said the result of the crash was “nothing less than a massive tragedy”.“In only a few seconds you’ve done something that affects the life of dozens of people,” Justice Lasry said.“This was no sudden lapse. It occurred over 14 kilometres of reckless driving on your part.”Justice Lasry said the sentence should act as a warning for anyone using ice and deplored the reality that many of the cases seen at the courts have been committed under the influence of drugs. Family members of the deceased packed the Supreme Court of Melbourne on Wednesday to see the verdict handed down. The pedestrian killed in the crash was Anthony Parsons, 45, a vision-impaired British civil servant.Mr Parsons was walking just ahead of his wife while crossing then intersection of Warrigal Road and Dandenong Road, until he was flung 50 metres down the road after the impact. His wife who was unharmed watched the incident happen right in front of her. She and her husband had been celebrating their 10 year wedding anniversary.Da Costa sat in the dock with his eyes shut tightly as the sentence was read out.Prosecutors called the accident the worst case of culpable driving ever in Victoria. Driving cases are normally heard in the County Court, but the case was upgraded to the Supreme Court to match the severity of the crash.Da Costa will serve a minimum of 11 years. Source: ABC, The Age Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Tsipras turns to prior actions

first_imgA day after securing a parliamentary vote of confidence in his government, from his coalition MPs, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras on Thursday shifted his attention to a much tougher challenge: the barrage of prior actions that must be legislated by mid-October to secure rescue loans.Tsipras is said to have asked his ministers to submit details of the measures that fall within their remit today so a bill can be drafted and submitted in Parliament early next week.In the meantime, he will seek to overcome any objections within SYRIZA, chairing a central committee meeting on Saturday and Sunday.With the opposition parties having made it clear, during the three-day debate on the government’s policy program, that they will not support additional austerity measures unconditionally, Tsipras can only hope for the support of the 155 coalition MPs in the 300-member House.But the backing of all of them is far from certain. Two coalition MPs – Costas Barkas of SYRIZA and Nikos Nikolopoulos of the right-wing Independent Greeks – reacted angrily to reports that the 49 prior actions would be brought to Parliament in one article.In comments to Skai, government spokesperson Olga Gerovasili suggested this would not be the case.The list of prior actions includes the liberalization of closed professions and markets, the finalization of plans to privatize Greece’s regional airports and measures aimed at curbing tax evasion.A second list of measures, linked to another loan worth 1 billion euros, will be tougher, with delayed pension reforms and increased farmers’ taxes on the agenda.Farmers are already planning protests. Authorities also have Greece’s creditors to contend with. Technical staff have returned to Athens ahead of a review that Tsipras said he wants to conclude by the end of November to pave the way for talks on debt relief.Greece’s European creditors oppose the idea of debt relief, but the International Monetary Fund regards it as indispensible. Speaking on Thursday at an IMF meeting in Lima, the Fund’s chief Christine Lagarde said that for the IMF to join Greece’s economic program, the program “must stand on two legs.”The first leg should comprise “significant reforms, particularly on the pension front and in bank governance,” she said, and the second “a debt operation that renders Greek debt sustainable in our assessment.”Source: Kathimerini Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Elderly Chania woman refuses to part ways with Oscar her 22 year

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram A 97 year woman refused to move to a nursing home that wouldn’t accept her dog, not wanting to leave her 22 year old furry friend. The Chania woman’s late husband had found an abandoned puppy on the streets, picked him up and brought him home. They named him Oscar. With advancing health problems, it was imperative for the woman to move to a nursing home. But the home she was to be sent to did not accept animals. But her devotion to her dog made it difficult for the woman who also did not have any friends or family that she could hand the dog over to. It was only until a neighbour was said to have contacted a local animal welfare organisation, informing them of the situation. From there, Oscar was adopted by a couple in Rethymno, his new owners saying that Oscar “seems to comply well with the new conditions despite his advanced age,” Keep Talking Greece reported. “He still remains cautious but enjoys the walks and the treats given from a loving hand.” The Chania woman was extremely thankful that her friend of 22 years was able to find a new, safe home.last_img read more

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