How much of the coronavirus does it take to make you sick? The science, explained

first_img Infectious respiratory diseases spread when a healthy person comes in contact with virus particles expelled by someone who is sick — usually through a cough or sneeze. The amount of particles a person is exposed to can affect how likely they are to become infected and, once infected, how severe the symptoms become.The amount of virus necessary to make a person sick is called the infectious dose. Viruses with low infectious doses are especially contagious in populations without significant immunity.The minimum infectious dose of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, is unknown so far, but researchers suspect it is low. “The virus is spread through very, very casual interpersonal contact,” W. David Hardy, a professor of infectious disease at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, told STAT.advertisement HealthHow much of the coronavirus does it take to make you sick? The science, explained By Alex Hogan April 14, 2020 Reprints Infectious Dose ExplainedVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2020/04/14/how-much-of-the-coronavirus-does-it-take-to-make-you-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0006:0006:00  Alex Hogan/STAT A high infectious dose may lead to a higher viral load, which can impact the severity of Covid-19 symptoms.Viral load is a measure of virus particles. It is the amount of virus present once a person has been infected and the virus has had time to replicate in their cells. With most viruses, higher viral loads are associated with worse outcomes.advertisement Please enter a valid email address. Senior Multimedia Producer Alex coordinates video production and STAT Brand Studio projects. “The more viral particles that get into the lungs, the more damage to the lungs that is probably happening,” said Hardy. Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. [email protected] center_img Alex Hogan About the Author Reprints Privacy Policy Alex Hogan/STAT @hoganalex Leave this field empty if you’re human: One study of Covid-19 patients in China found that those with more severe symptoms tended to have higher viral loads.“It’s not proven, but it would make sense that higher inoculating doses will lead to higher viral loads, and higher viral loads would translate into more pathogenic clinical courses,” said Dan Barouch, director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Viral Load ExplainedVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2020/04/14/how-much-of-the-coronavirus-does-it-take-to-make-you-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0005:5205:52  Alex Hogan/STAT People with higher viral loads may also shed more whole viruses, which makes them more contagious, compounding the danger of spreading disease more widely.If exposure to higher doses, or even frequent low doses, of SARS-CoV-2 does lead to worse health outcomes, there are significant implications for health care workers who are routinely exposed to Covid-19 patients.“Someone caring for large numbers of patients on the wards, if they’re not wearing PPE [personal protective equipment], there might be a high frequency of exposure as well as a high dose of exposure,” Barouch said.In Italy, a country particularly hard-hit by the virus, about 9% of reported cases were health care workers. Here in the U.S., 10% of Covid-19 cases in California were health care workers, according to the California Department of Public Health. Tags Coronavirusinfectious diseaselast_img

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