Towns, Timberwolves beat Suns

first_imgEDITORS’ PICK Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Towns had 28 points and 15 rebounds, and the Timberwolves beat the Phoenix Suns, 115-108, on Monday night.“I was going to do everything in my power and my part to ensure we didn’t come out of tonight with a loss,” Towns said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliAndrew Wiggins scored 26 points and Zach LaVine added 23 for the Timberwolves. Ricky Rubio had 12 assists and Minnesota picked up its first win at home since Nov. 17.Eric Bledsoe scored 27 points for the Suns, who have lost three straight and four out of five. Brandon Knight had 21 points off the bench and Devin Booker scored 18 on 6-for-15 shooting for Phoenix. After Phoenix cut the Wolves’ lead to 105-103 with four minutes to play, Towns grabbed two offensive rebounds against Tyson Chandler, who ranks fifth in the NBA in rebounding, and scored on the second putback after getting fouled.Towns let out a yell and pounded his bicep, then swished the free throw for a five-point lead. The play ignited a 10-2 run that put away the game.“Even missing the first one, I was determined to get that second one,” Towns said. “I would’ve gotten a foul running over someone to get it. Every single ounce of energy I had left to make sure I go up and get that ball.”That kind of intensity is what Wolves coach Tom Thibodeau has been trying to instill from the start.“Great, multiple-effort play,” Thibodeau said. “That’s will and determination and often times that’s the difference right there between winning and losing.”TIP-INSSuns: Knight made 8 of 13 shots, and his efficiency in the first half kept the game from getting away from the Suns while Booker and Bledsoe started 3 for 14. … Jared Dudley scored 12 and Leandro Barbosa had 10 points for the Suns bench, which outscored Minnesota’s 44-20. … The Suns missed 10 free throws.Timberwolves: Rubio made two technical free throws to run his streak to 34 straight without a miss. That’s the longest active streak in the league after Stephen Curry’s ended at 44 in a row last week. … The Wolves went 24 for 25 from the line.VOLATILE SUNSMarqueese Chriss and P.J. Tucker both picked up technical fouls for arguing with the officials, and the Suns had trouble keeping their composure for much of the night. Chriss was particularly erratic, barking at officials Monty McCutcheon, David Guthrie and Kane Fitzgerald and wrestling with Towns under the basket. Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town MOST READ Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Tucker voiced his displeasure often while guarding Wiggins, with officials not letting him play as physical as the burly forward likes to on that end.“We let it get to us early as far as the refs and the other team, we let it get to us and we could never recuperate from it,” Bledsoe said.UP NEXTSuns: Phoenix heads back home to face the Houston Rockets on Wednesday.Timberwolves: Minnesota hits the road to play the Atlanta Hawks on Wednesday.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND The game figured to be heavy on offense, with two young teams far more concerned with putting the ball in the basket than stopping anyone on the other end.The Suns came into the game second in the league in pace, second in fast-break points and third in points off turnovers. And the Wolves are the first team in history to have three 21-year-olds averaging at least 20 points per game.“One thing we know we need to get better at is our toughness,” Suns coach Earl Watson said. “That’s not a stat. We have to become more feisty because we are small on the perimeter.”The Wolves built a 14-point lead in the first half, but have given away double-digit leads all season long. They were coming off a particularly disheartening loss against Houston on Saturday night in which they blew a 12-point lead with two minutes to play before losing in overtime.Phoenix cut the deficit to two points several times in the fourth, but the Wolves had an answer each time.ADVERTISEMENT Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH APMINNEAPOLIS — Karl-Anthony Towns has watched his Minnesota Timberwolves give up so many leads this season that he had finally had enough.Once he made up his mind, the Phoenix Suns couldn’t hold him down.ADVERTISEMENT Bulls break out of slump, rout Pistons As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Senators to proceed with review of VFA We are young Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes View commentslast_img read more

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‘Rarest’ ape’s path to survival blocked by roads, dams and agriculture

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Dams, Deforestation, Development, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Featured, Forests, Great Apes, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Infrastructure, Mammals, Oil Palm, Orangutans, Over-hunting, Palm Oil, Poaching, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Research, Roads, Sustainable Development, Tigers, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade According to a new study, the Tapanuli orangutan, one of only seven species of non-human great ape alive today, faces serious threats to its survival as infrastructure development and agriculture threaten more than one-quarter of its habitat.In November, a team of scientists reported that a new species of orangutan living on the Indonesian island of Sumatra was distinct from Sumatran and Bornean orangutans.They believe that fewer than 800 Tapanuli orangutans survive.Conservationists and scientists warn that a proposed 510-megawatt hydroelectric dam could push the new species closer to extinction. Even as scientists introduced the world to a new species of orangutan in 2017 — one of only seven non-human great apes alive today — they were already working to pinpoint the threats that might lead to its demise.In a new study published today in the journal Current Biology, a team of scientists reports that road expansion, agricultural conversion and a planned hydropower project could destroy more than one-quarter of the Tapanuli orangutan’s existing habitat. With no more than 800 individuals, the world’s rarest ape species could face extinction not long after we became aware of its existence.“In forty years of research, I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything this dramatic,” said William Laurance, a tropical ecologist at James Cook University in Australia and the team’s leader, in a statement.A male Tapanuli orangutan in the Batang Toru forest. Image by Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0).In November, a different group of researchers concluded that orangutans living in the Batang Toru region should be considered a new species, Pongo tapanuliensis. Based on the differences in their behavior, genetics and morphology, the Tapanuli orangutan is distinct from its cousins living in the rainforests of Borneo (Pongo pygmaeus) and elsewhere in Sumatra (Pongo abelii), they argued.Around the same time, Laurance and his colleagues had created detailed maps of the road network across northern Sumatra, including the forests of Batang Toru, part of a broader effort to map both infrastructure projects and targets for conservation across Southeast Asia. They decided to use those analyses to explore the impact the existing — and future — infrastructure developments might have on the Tapanuli orangutan.“It just seemed like an obvious thing to do,” Laurance told Mongabay.The estimated range of Pongo tapanuliensis in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, with the region’s legal forest-use designations and non-forest land covers. Image courtesy of Sloan et al., 2018.They found that planned developments pose a serious threat to this species’ survival, not to mention that of other animals such as the critically endangered Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae).The forests that are home to the Tapanuli orangutan are split into eastern and western “blocks,” along with the Lubuk Raya reserve, creating three isolated populations. What’s more, about 5 percent of the remaining numbers live in the Dolok Sibual Buali reserve, linked to the western block by a sliver of forest only about 700 meters (2,300 feet) wide.This corridor, as well as a sizeable chunk of the eastern block of habitat, have been zoned for oil palm and other types of agriculture, putting around 14 percent of the species’ total habitat in danger of development. Splitting the already-disjointed orangutan populations into smaller and smaller pieces will increase the chances of problems like inbreeding and accelerate the species’ slide toward extinction, the authors write.But the most pressing threat looming over these orangutans is a proposed 510-megawatt hydroelectric dam.“It’s right in the core habitat,” Laurance said.Land cleared as a staging area for the building of a new hydroelectric dam. Image courtesy of Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme.Based on the team’s analyses, they figure the project would dramatically change 96 square kilometers (37 square miles), or about 8 percent, of the animal’s range in the next four years. The dam’s construction would inevitably carry with it a suite of ancillary impacts, such as the access roads that crews will build and the pathways for power lines that they’ll have to carve through the forest. Such openings into the forest increase the odds that farmers will clear more land for agriculture or hunters will enter the area.Conversely, restoring forest at the proposed site of the dam would create a few narrow corridors that could reconnect the eastern and western populations and boost the species’ chances of survival, Laurance said.Despite these concerns, the project continues to move forward. Laurance said that he received confirmation that the World Bank has decided not to help fund the $1.6-billion project, likely because of the potential environmental damage. But the Bank of China has pledged financing for the dam, and a Chinese-state-owned hydroelectric company called Sinohydro has signed on to handle its construction.“It’s only about 510 megawatts. That’s not that much,” said Serge Wich, a primatologist at England’s Liverpool John Moores University, in an interview. “There are alternatives to get that energy.”Bornean (left), Sumatran (middle) and Tapanuli (right) male orangutans. Image by Eric Kilby, Aiwok and Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (GFDL).Wich was not involved in this research, but he was a coauthor of the paper announcing the new orangutan species in November.“There is so little time to protect this species,” he said. “The main value in this paper for us is that we can use it to further indicate what the main threats are and that there are still parts of their habitat need to be protected.”He urged the dam’s developers and representatives of the Indonesian government “to have a sensible discussion” about alternatives for generating power in this part of Sumatra. In the same vein, a growing cadre of scientists and conservation organizations, led by groups like the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme and the Sumatran Orangutan Society, are campaigning for a change in the project’s course.But if that doesn’t happen, the dam would be “the beginning of the end of this species,” Wich said.He said that little beyond the “extreme conservation” approached used in shepherding Africa’s mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) back from the brink of extinction, such as near-round-the-clock surveillance by armed guards, will keep the Tapanuli orangutan from disappearing forever.An adult female Tapanuli orangutan. Image by Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0).“Personally, I think it would be an enormous tragedy if we would lose a species for 510 megawatts,” he added. “That sounds absurd to me, but that seems [to be] where it’s heading if the government and company are not willing to change their path.”Laurance and his colleagues agree, arguing in the paper that the government should protect every bit of the animal’s remaining habitat without hesitation.“It’s not going to take a huge push to actually drive something like this to extinction,” he said. “It is absolutely time to pull out all the stops.”Banner image of an adult female Tapanuli orangutan by Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0). John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCITATIONSNater, A., Mattle-Greminger, M. P., Nurcahyo, A., Nowak, M. G., de Manuel, M., Desai, T., … & Lameira, A. R. (2017). Morphometric, behavioral, and genomic evidence for a new Orangutan species. Current Biology, 27(22), 3487-3498.Sloan, S., Supriatna, J., Campbell, M. J., Alamgir, M., & Laurance, W. F. (2018). Newly discovered orangutan species requires urgent habitat protection. Current Biology, 28:R1-R3.Editor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

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