Google Chrome 40 stable version released for Windows

first_img The extensions (around 1,500 of them) were released for users of the Chrome 4.0 browser beta version last December, but the gallery is now available for all users running Windows. Chrome 4.0 is still in beta release for the Apple Mac and Linux, and while extensions are available for Linux, they are still in development for the Mac and may not be released for up to a year. Google has three channels for the release of Chrome: a developer preview for testing, a beta channel for refining the features, and a stable channel for general release after thorough testing. When a stable version is released it is automatically delivered to all users in the stable channel, and it also becomes available for manual downloading and updating of the beta version.Google’s Product Manager Ian Fette said the extensions use a multi-process technology that ensures they do not slow down the browser or cause it to crash. Extensions are among the features that have made Mozilla Firefox such a popular browser. They allow users to add functions to their browsers, such as one-click links to favorite applications or news updates, and other helpful shortcuts for common tasks. Chrome 4.0 for Windows has several Java and HTML5 application programming interfaces (APIs) including the Web SQL database for storing data on the computer in a structured manner, Web Sockets (which sends data over a persistent two-way communication channel), and Web Storage (which allows websites to store data on the local PC). It also includes bookmark synchronization to allow users to share bookmarks across several computers without the need to copy or recreate them each time you use a different computer. Bookmark synch is also available for Linux users, but not yet for the Mac.Google says its Chrome 4.0 browser is much faster, and Mozilla’s Dromaeo DOM core tests showed it has boosted speed by 42 percent over the last stable release, and 400 percent since the first version. Chrome was faster than Mozilla Firefox 3.6 in three of the four tests.The stable version of Chrome 4.0 is available for download at the Google website. Citation: Google Chrome 4.0 stable version released for Windows (2010, January 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-01-google-chrome-stable-version-windows.html Video: Using Extensions on Google Chrome (for PCs). Chrome 4.0 beta web browser launched Explore further More information: Google blog post: googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/0 … nc-and-more-for.htmlResources for Developers: blog.chromium.org/2010/01/more … -for-developers.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — All PC users running Windows can now have access to Google Chrome’s new extension gallery, with the release earlier this week of a stable version of the Chrome 4.0 browser for Windows. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Wind energy creating a problem with military and weather radar

first_img Explore further Citation: Wind energy creating a problem with military and weather radar (2011, November 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-11-energy-problem-military-weather-radar.html (PhysOrg.com) — With the push for creating green energy, giant windmill farms are becoming more and more common for electricity production. However, the National Weather Service and the United States Air Force say these wind farms are creating much more than energy and are making their jobs more difficult when it comes to detecting storms and keeping aircraft safe. A wind farm in South Australia According to these agencies, the giant wind farms distort the weather radar and military radar, creating blank spots. When it comes to the USAF, wind farms create issues when it comes to detecting incoming planes by creating these blank spots on the radar. Construction of many wind farms were blocked because they were intended to be built near radar locations. However, politicians began pushing to build these wind farms and help create jobs.Luckily, scientists from MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory were able to develop an answer. They developed algorithms and processors that were able to fool the radar. This fix worked by telling the radar to ignore signals from a small area where the wind farms were located.For the National Weather Service, this makes it difficult to determine if a storm showing up on radar is actually a storm or a mix between the wind generated by the farms and the rain in the area. In many cases, the National Weather Service is left to issue warnings just in case there are storms in the area and there have been false alarms.When it comes to the National Weather Service, there is no fix for the radar issue. However, there may be ways around it. One idea is to ask the area wind farms to turn off the propellers during storms or approaching bad weather. Another is to install devices on the propellers that measure wind speeds and rainfall, thus eliminating the need for radar in that location. Radar scientists are also working on creating a fix for weather radar similar to the MIT fix for the military.From now on, you can follow Physorg.com on Google+ too!center_img © 2011 PhysOrg.com Researchers capture impressive tornadic data and images This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Why weve got the cosmological constant all wrong

first_img Citation: Why we’ve got the cosmological constant all wrong (2012, March 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-weve-cosmological-constant-wrong.html Physicists propose test for loop quantum gravity (PhysOrg.com) — Some scientists call the cosmological constant the “worst prediction of physics.” And when today’s theories give an estimated value that is about 120 orders of magnitude larger than the measured value, it’s hard to argue with that title. In a new study, a team of physicists has taken a different view of the cosmological constant, Λ, which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe. While the cosmological constant is usually interpreted as a vacuum energy, here the physicists provide evidence to support the possibility that the mysterious force instead emerges from a microscopic quantum theory of gravity, which is currently beyond physicists’ reach. Effective field theory incorrectly predicts the value of the cosmological constant, Λ, as well as the value of an analogous term in an analogous gravity model in the form of a BEC. BECs are correctly described only by quantum models, and a quantum theory of gravity may be required to correctly predict Λ. Image credit: Finazzi, et al. ©2012 American Physical Society The scientists, Stefano Finazzi, currently of the University of Trento in Povo-Trento, Italy; Stefano Liberati at SISSA, INFN in Trieste, Italy; and Lorenzo Sindoni from the Albert Einstein Institute in Golm, Germany, have published their study in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.The authors are far from the first who are dissatisfied with the cosmological constant. Previously, other scientists have suggested that the huge discrepancy between the observed and estimated values is due to the use of semi-classical effective field theory (EFT) calculations for estimating a quantity that can be computed only using a full quantum theory of gravity. Although no one can show what value a quantum theory of gravity would give without having such a theory, physicists have shown that EFT calculations fail at estimating similar values in analogue gravity models. Here, the physicists consider an analogue gravity model in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), a group of atoms that behave as a single quantum system when cooled to temperatures near absolute zero. While a BEC may seem to have nothing in common with the expanding universe, the physicists showed in a previous paper that a BEC can be described by the same Poisson equation that describes nonrelativistic (Newtonian) gravity. This framework includes a term that is analogous to the cosmological constant; this term describes the part of a BEC’s ground-state energy that corresponds to the condensate’s quantum depletion.Since BECs are accurately described by other (quantum) equations, the physicists decided to test how well EFT calculations could compute the BEC’s analogous cosmological constant term. They found that EFT calculations do not give the correct result. The finding confirms the earlier studies that showed that EFT calculations produce an incorrect result when used to compute the ground-state energy of other analogue gravity models. More information: Stefano Finazzi, et al. “Cosmological Constant: A Lesson from Bose-Einstein Condensates.” PRL 108, 071101 (2012). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.071101center_img Explore further Copyright 2012 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. “We have shown how conceptually subtle could be the computation of the cosmological constant, by considering an analogue gravity model,” Finazzi told PhysOrg.com. “This simple example shows that the knowledge of the microscopic structure of spacetime might be an essential guide for a correct interpretation of the nature of the cosmological constant, and hence for a correct estimate of it. We then reinterpret the large discrepancy between the naive computation and the observed value as a basic misunderstanding on this point. Interestingly, this reasoning might also be a guide to the selection of the correct quantum gravity theory.”As the physicists explain, the BEC model described by Poisson equations is too simple to completely describe the complex features of the universe’s accelerating expansion. However, the failure of the EFT framework to describe BECs’ analogue cosmological constant supports the possibility that the EFT framework also fails at describing the cosmological constant. The details have further implications. For one thing, the results suggest that there may be no a priori reason to describe the cosmological constant as vacuum energy. Instead, the cosmological constant may emerge from the underlying quantum theory of gravity describing spacetime. As the physicists explain, a quantum theory of gravity differs from various modified theories of gravity that have been proposed recently in that a quantum theory describes spacetime at the most fundamental level.“In a modified gravity theory, one is just postulating a different gravitational dynamics that might show accelerated expansion also for a universe filled with standard matter (i.e., without the so-called dark energy component),” Liberati said. “We instead consider the case where a gravitational dynamics is emergent from a microscopic quantum theory, i.e., a theory describing the fundamental constituents, whatever they are, of our spacetime. From such a theory one would be able to derive a theory of gravity (general relativity or any form of modified gravity) in some appropriate limit (possibly similar in nature to the hydrodynamic limit of a gas of interacting atoms). Our point is that it is only throughout this derivation/emergence of the gravitational dynamics that in the end one can determine what is the gravitating ‘energy of the vacuum.’ We have proven this explicitly in our toy model where it is clearly shown that the use of the macroscopic constituents (and corresponding energy scales) of the emergent physics might lead to a completely wrong estimate.“We can try to explain this issue with a simple analogy,” he said. “Water is made by molecules. At a microscopic level molecular dynamics is properly described by quantum mechanics. However, no one would use quantum mechanics to describe a flowing river, but rather one would use fluid mechanics laws. Of course, fluid dynamics must be compatible with quantum mechanics, i.e., it must be possible to derive it from the microscopic quantum theory of molecules. Finally, the choice of the most appropriate equations for the description of any phenomenon depends on the scale at which one observes the physical system. We hence can say that the microscopic quantum theory of gravity corresponds in the analogy to the quantum mechanics of molecules, a theory of gravity corresponds to fluid mechanics, and the evolution of the universe to the flow of the river.”Continuing the analogy, Liberati adds that there might be a quantity in macroscopic fluid dynamics that cannot be calculated using macroscopic parameters alone. Instead, a microscopic model is necessary to calculate the correct value.“We argue that, in the case of the calculation of the cosmological constant, this is exactly what happens: the reason of the ‘worst prediction of theoretical physics’ might ultimately be due to the attempt to compute a quantity that is sensitive to the microphysics only in terms of macroscopic quantities,” he said.In the future, the physicists hope to further investigate how the BEC analogue model of gravity could possibly lead to the development of a quantum theory of gravity, since many proposed theories of gravity have features in common with the new model.“We believe that this model can help to change the way how people usually think about the cosmological constant,” Sindoni said. “In recent years, the idea that spacetime is a form of condensate is gaining momentum. Of course, to be able to get to theories as close as possible to general relativity, the microscopic models have to be considerably more complex than BECs. However, it can be conjectured that spacetime is the final outcome of a phase transition for a large number of suitable microscopic constituents, and that the determination of the resulting macroscopic dynamics might be essentially the same, at the conceptual level, of the determination of the dynamics of a BEC from the knowledge of effective molecular or atomic dynamics, near a phase transition. The translation of the language and ideas of BECs to quantum gravity models might be a key in the understanding of the physical content of the latter.”Sindoni adds that the cosmological constant will provide a vital test of any proposed quantum theory of gravity.“We think that the comparison of the observational value of the cosmological constant against its theoretical value, predicted by any theory of quantum gravity, can be a very good (if not the unique) test to validate such theories,” he said. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Japanese researchers build robot with most humanlike muscleskeleton structure yet w video

first_imgThe result is a robot sized to approximate the average 12 year old Japanese boy – with bones made of aluminum that have been connected together in a way that very closely resembles the way human bones are connected, e.g. artificial ligaments, etc., and a collection of muscles that mimic very closely those in the human body as well. Kenshiro has 160 muscles that are constructed using a single actuator motor for individual muscle groups with each consisting of a system of wires and moving pulleys. “He” stands 158 centimeters tall and weighs 50 kilograms and at this time has more muscles than any other robot.Though Kinshiro is a single individual robot, in action, it appears to be a collection of parts cobbled together to form a single whole. The robot can walk, but just barely. It can do deep knee bends, but the rest of the body seems out of sync. Thus, this new robot is clearly more of a research project than an attempt to build a robot that moves around like a real human being. It does very clearly demonstrate however, where the research is headed and what the ultimate goal is: nothing short of a robot that mimics the human body down to the very smallest details and moves in exactly the same ways. Kenshiro is the next step for the researchers. Their previous effort resulted in a robot they called Kojiro – a robot that demonstrated the huge strides that have come in mimicking the human body, as well as the very long road yet to travel. In this new iteration, Kenshiro was preceded by a robot concept the team called Kenzoh. In that effort the team found that simply adding artificial muscle and bones generally tended to create weight problems. The upper body alone came to 45 kg. That caused the team to go back to the drawing board, this time with the idea of mimicking human bone and muscle at the individual body part level, i.e. a backbone, calf, or knee joint. Each part was custom designed to fall within the weight parameters of actual human limbs and other parts of the body. (Phys.org)—Researchers at the University of Tokyo have taken another step towards creating a robot with a faithfully recreated human skeleton and muscle structure. Called Kenshiro, the robot has been demonstrated at the recent Humanoids 2012 conference in Osaka, Japan. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further More information: via IEEE © 2012 Phys.org Scientists study robot-human interactions Citation: Japanese researchers build robot with most humanlike muscle-skeleton structure yet (w/ video) (2012, December 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-12-japanese-robot-humanlike-muscle-skeleton-video.htmllast_img read more

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Researchers find nonape species engages in rapid facial mimicry

first_img More information: Rapid Facial Mimicry In Geladas, Scientific Reports 3, Article number: 1527 doi:10.1038/srep01527AbstractRapid facial mimicry (RFM) is an automatic response, in which individuals mimic others’ expressions. RFM, only demonstrated in humans and apes, is grounded in the automatic perception-action coupling of sensorimotor information occurring in the mirror neuron system. In humans, RFM seems to reflect the capacity of individuals to empathize with others. Here, we demonstrated that, during play, RFM is also present in a cercopithecoid species (Theropithecus gelada). Mother-infant play sessions were not only characterized by the highest levels of RFM, but also by the fastest responses. Our findings suggest that RFM in humans have homologous not only in apes, but also in cercopitecoids. Moreover, data point to similarities in the modality in which mother-infant synchronous behaviours are expressed among primates, suggesting a common evolutionary root in the basic elements of mother-infant affective exchanges. (Phys.org) —A team of researchers made up of members from three academic centers in Italy has found the first instance of rapid facial mimicry (RFM) outside of humans and apes. In their paper published in Scientific Reports, the researchers report observation of RFM in geladas, a type of cercopithecoid or old-world monkey. Explore further Scientists studying human behavior have long known of RFM, it’s where one person mimics the facial expression of a person they are looking at, almost instantly—it’s considered to be involuntary and many scientists believe it’s tied to empathy. It can be seen as a sudden look of concern by a person noting concern on the face of a friend perhaps, or the mimicking of a strained smile. Until now, RFM has been seen only in humans and orangutans.To find out if geladas exhibit RFM as well, the researchers studied a group of them residing in Germany’s NaturZoo. The monkeys were watched as they engaged in play, as RFM has been tied to emotional connections. The team watched monkeys of all ages interact with one another and video recorded them for later study. Specifically, they looked to see if normal play-type face-making—different ways the monkeys open their mouths—would be mimicked by others. In studying the tapes, the researchers found that was indeed the case, the monkeys did mimic each other’s facial expressions in much the same way we humans do. More specifically, they found that RFM was most apparent between mothers and their infant offspring—not only did they engage in it more often, but they also did it quicker than with other pairings in the group.Finding RFM in other species besides humans has been somewhat of a surprise to those who study the ways people interact. Because it is generally believed to be tied to empathy, most in the field assumed it was exclusive to humans. Now that RFM has been found in both apes and monkeys, researchers are left to wonder if their original theories were correct, or if new ones need to be developed. If RFM does indicate empathy, then that would mean other species besides humans are capable of experiencing it. If it doesn’t, then why is it used by any species? Here’s looking at you, fellow! An example of congruent response in RFM – RFM during a play session between an adult (left) and an immature individual (right). Credit: Scientific Reports 3, Article number: 1527 doi:10.1038/srep01527, Photo by P.F. Ferraricenter_img Journal information: Scientific Reports © 2013 Phys.org Citation: Researchers find non-ape species engages in rapid facial mimicry (2013, April 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-04-non-ape-species-engages-rapid-facial.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Genomic study of Indian populations finds five distinct ancestral components

first_img Citation: Genomic study of Indian populations finds five distinct ancestral components (2016, January 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-genomic-indian-populations-distinct-ancestral.html (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the National Institute of BioMedical Genomics, in India has found via genetic study, five distinct ancestral components for the people of India. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Analabha Basu, Neeta Sarkar-Roy and Partha Majumder describe their genetic analysis of the genomes of several hundred people from across the country and what their study revealed about Indian history. © 2016 Phys.org Genomic research shows Indians descended from two groups Prior research had found evidence that suggested that the vast majority of India’s people came from just two ancestral populations. The researchers with this new effort have widened that number to five, four distinct “haplotypes” on the mainland and one among the people of the Andaman archipelago.To learn more about the ancestral history of present-day Indians, the researchers collected tissue samples from 367 people from 18 locations on the mainland and two from the Nicobar and Andaman Islands (a total of 20 ethnic groups were represented)—the team then conducted a genomic analysis that allowed for comparing the lineage of those among the test group with one another and also with samples of other people held in the Human Genome Diversity Panel.The team reports that their study revealed that the four ancestral groups they found included what they describe as people of north and south Indian ancestries, people of Austro-Asiatic descent and people with Tibeto-Burman ancestries. Those from the islands were found to share genes with present-day Pacific Islanders. They also found evidence of the first Indians coming from Africa—another later wave of people came to the area from East and South Central Asia. They also found that the earliest people tended to intermingle for many years, sharing their genes across lineages, but that came to halt approximately 70 generations ago, which equated to approximately 1,575 years ago—the time period of the Gupta emperors, when the caste system was begun. Intermingling between the upper and lower castes diminished to the point that it could be seen in the genes of people alive today.The researchers note that their study has revealed that Indian ancestry is far more genetically diverse than has been thought and also point out that they have shown that shifts in societal practices can lead to changes in the genomes of the people that live there, over many generations. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencescenter_img Explore further Credit: NIH More information: Analabha Basu et al. Genomic reconstruction of the history of extant populations of India reveals five distinct ancestral components and a complex structure, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1513197113AbstractIndia, occupying the center stage of Paleolithic and Neolithic migrations, has been underrepresented in genome-wide studies of variation. Systematic analysis of genome-wide data, using multiple robust statistical methods, on (i) 367 unrelated individuals drawn from 18 mainland and 2 island (Andaman and Nicobar Islands) populations selected to represent geographic, linguistic, and ethnic diversities, and (ii) individuals from populations represented in the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP), reveal four major ancestries in mainland India. This contrasts with an earlier inference of two ancestries based on limited population sampling. A distinct ancestry of the populations of Andaman archipelago was identified and found to be coancestral to Oceanic populations. Analysis of ancestral haplotype blocks revealed that extant mainland populations (i) admixed widely irrespective of ancestry, although admixtures between populations was not always symmetric, and (ii) this practice was rapidly replaced by endogamy about 70 generations ago, among upper castes and Indo-European speakers predominantly. This estimated time coincides with the historical period of formulation and adoption of sociocultural norms restricting intermarriage in large social strata. A similar replacement observed among tribal populations was temporally less uniform. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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The paint brush activist

first_imgMeera Dayal forays into the world of nature preservation with just a paintbrush and a canvas in hand. And what an impact she makes! Her latest exhibition Inscapes II to be held at the Annexe Art Gallery at IIC from 11 to 16 November, moves viewers to think deeply not only about Mother Nature’s beauty, but also her vulnerability. The painter asks the viewer to approach each painting as a pure and unique experience, a flight into the unknown, without preconceptions and preparation. Each painting speaks for itself, while at the same time one wonders at the artist’s extraordinary mastery over the art. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Meera’s relationship with nature is deep rooted. Having spent a large part of her childhood in the Himalayas? foothills, the relationship was gradually nurtured and had a huge impact on her sensibility and later also laid the foundation of her work. ‘My message, if I have one, is simply this: Let us preserve Nature. Let us nurture it rather than destroy it in the name of ‘development’.  Trees are essential for the environment and fight pollution in urban areas, so why don’t we plant trees instead of building concrete blocks?’, she emphasizes. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe delicate petals of a deep ? purple pansy, the auburn autumn leaf, a valley of wildflowers playing with the wind- all suggest a beauty to cherish, while reminding one of their strength of perseverance. These are important for the survival of the world, but are now endangered only due to the negligence of man Meera has largely been working in oils, acrylics, pastels, mixed media, pen and ink, water colours etc.  Another feather in her cap is her interest in textiles. She has worked for an export company designing textiles, embroideries, handicrafts and jewellery for many famous stores. At the same time she continued to draw and paint and branched out into the world of publishing. She has designed book covers and did illustrations for many of the leading publishers like Oxford University Press, Penguin India, Kali for Women, Ratna Sagar Books and many others.When: 11 -16 November, Where: IIC ,ANNEXE Art Gallery, Lodhi Roadlast_img read more

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Head for the hills

first_imgWith summer ruling the capital with all its scorching glory, the best bet for the weekends ahead is to pack your bags and head for the hills. And, India being blessed with topographical variety, spotting a serene getaway can hardly be a herculean task. The hill stations are not too far from the Capital because of its close proximity to the Himalayas. The landscape changes completely once the state borders are crossed. Here are a few must visit hill stops if you are planning a quick weekend away from the hustle-bustle of the city.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Nainital:This lake city, lying at the Kumaon foothills of the outer Himalayas, offers a cool climate and is a treat to the eyes. The hotels too offer cheap accommodation, so one needn’t loosen their purse strings much! The valley houses the Nainital lake, popularly known as the Naini lake along with three other lakes, thereby giving it the tag of a lake district. Only six hours from the city, the place is best for quick weekend getaways.   Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixKasauli:Yet another joyful ride for those, who detest noise and crave for peace. Booking a resort there is easy and a road trip to Kasauli indeed brings about the much needed change with the surroundings and the climate taking complete charge to sooth your senses. Solan:Known as the mushroom city of India, Solan is a place one should definitely include in his must-see list. Located in Himachal Pradesh, this place comes second after Simla, when it comes to population. The greenery is bound to captivate your eyes, as this busy little city adds to your ‘Himachali’ experience.   Ranikhet:Situated 350 kms away from Delhi, Ranikhet which lies in Almora district of Uttarakhand, is known for its pleasant climate, across the months of March right till October. Subtle and quiet, the serene environment is refreshing. One can view the awe-inspiring picturesque Himalayan peaks while sipping on a hot cup of tea. Also, the place bears special attraction for golf enthusiasts for housing one of the most beautiful and highest golf courses of Asia. Kausani:For those seeking adventure, Kausani is the place to be. The Himalayan peaks of Trisul, Nanda Devi and Panchchul that can be viewed through this picturesque hill station of Kausani, which lies in the Bageshwar district of Uttarakhand. The place is situated within proximity to various trekking routes that are sure to cater to the needs of adventure enthusiasts.Dalhousie:If one is planning for an extended weekend, the best place to be is Dalhousie, which has a charm of its own. A trek to the Daikund peak is sure to unravel one’s senses. The place is also the repository of ancient Hindu temples which are sure to transport you back to an India, waiting to be explored. Added attractions include the Satdhara falls, Khajjiar lake and of course, the Kalatop Khajjiar sanctuary, for those inclined towards exotic wildlife.   With so many options at hand, all you need to do is just grab your bag pack and get going!Compiled by Rishibha Kumarilast_img read more

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Belgian Ambassador in city throws light on bilateral trade ties with India

first_imgKolkata: The diamond trade between India and Belgium is important along with chemicals, pharmaceuticals and machinery sectors that feature in the trade between the two countries. About 200 Belgian companies have invested in India. Clean technologies, waste management and Smart Cities are of interest to Belgium. About 80 Indian companies operate in Belgium at the moment, said Jan Luykx, Belgian Ambassador.He was addressing a meeting organised by the Merchants’ Chamber of Commerce and Industries on Tuesday afternoon. Luykx emphasised that the Belgian economy is driven by the private sector on the basis of commercial interests and the Embassy/Government does not interfere. The Belgian Embassy encourages Belgians to visit India so that they can decide on investing in India. Civil Aviation is in private hands in Belgium and its Government cannot predict growth in aviation between the two nations. It is up to private sector Belgian companies to be involved with the Smart Cities in India. With respect to Smart Cities and waste management, the Belgian Embassy puts together information and involves actors in their field. With regard to starting more student exchange programmes, the Ambassador said educational institutions need to take an interest and not the Government. There are already several Indian colleges which have agreements with Belgian Universities.Among positive features of the Belgian economy, Antwerp port is one of the most efficient ports of Europe. Luykx reminded that Belgium is part of a vast common market, thanks to EU. Vishal Jhajharia, Senior Vice-President, MCCI in his welcome address said India is Belgium’s second largest export destination and third largest trade partner outside the EU.last_img read more

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Man commits suicide after killing wife

first_imgKolkata: A middle-aged man from Howrah hanged himself after he allegedly killed his wife by slitting her throat.The incident took place on Danesh Seikh Lane in Howrah’s shibpur area on Tuesday morning. Police said Bablu Pathak, a tailor by profession was found hanging from the ceiling fan inside his room, while his wife Papri was found in bed with her throat slit in the adjacent room.The couple used to live in a government residential apartment situated on the third floor of a building. The matter came to light when Pathak’s elder brother, Shibu Pathak came to their house to meet the victim at around 9.30 am on Tuesday. The incident triggered tension among locals. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedHe informed the police that he knocked on the door for several times but none responded. He brought a local resident to the spot who pushed the front door from outside. As a result, the door opened and Pathak’s elder brother was shocked to see him in hanging dead from the ceiling. They immediately informed the local police. When police entered the apartment, they found the woman lying dead in bed with blood all around.The investigators recovered a chopper and a knife from the room, which were later sent for forensic examination. According to a preliminary investigation, police suspect that Pathak had killed his wife and then committed suicide. A suicide note was also recovered from the room where Pathak mentions that nobody was responsible for their deaths. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPThe victim’s elder brother also told the police that he talked to him over phone on Monday evening and the victim said that he was unwell. He called him several times since Tuesday morning but the calls remained unanswered and then he decided to visit his younger brother’s house. The air-conditioning machine was on when the police entered the apartment.Police also came to know that there was a quarrel between the couple for sometime due to some financial reasons. Police are investigating all possible angles into the incident. Both the bodies have been sent for the post-mortem. A detailed probe has been initiated in this regard.last_img read more

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