‘Rarest’ ape’s path to survival blocked by roads, dams and agriculture

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Dams, Deforestation, Development, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Featured, Forests, Great Apes, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Infrastructure, Mammals, Oil Palm, Orangutans, Over-hunting, Palm Oil, Poaching, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Research, Roads, Sustainable Development, Tigers, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade According to a new study, the Tapanuli orangutan, one of only seven species of non-human great ape alive today, faces serious threats to its survival as infrastructure development and agriculture threaten more than one-quarter of its habitat.In November, a team of scientists reported that a new species of orangutan living on the Indonesian island of Sumatra was distinct from Sumatran and Bornean orangutans.They believe that fewer than 800 Tapanuli orangutans survive.Conservationists and scientists warn that a proposed 510-megawatt hydroelectric dam could push the new species closer to extinction. Even as scientists introduced the world to a new species of orangutan in 2017 — one of only seven non-human great apes alive today — they were already working to pinpoint the threats that might lead to its demise.In a new study published today in the journal Current Biology, a team of scientists reports that road expansion, agricultural conversion and a planned hydropower project could destroy more than one-quarter of the Tapanuli orangutan’s existing habitat. With no more than 800 individuals, the world’s rarest ape species could face extinction not long after we became aware of its existence.“In forty years of research, I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything this dramatic,” said William Laurance, a tropical ecologist at James Cook University in Australia and the team’s leader, in a statement.A male Tapanuli orangutan in the Batang Toru forest. Image by Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0).In November, a different group of researchers concluded that orangutans living in the Batang Toru region should be considered a new species, Pongo tapanuliensis. Based on the differences in their behavior, genetics and morphology, the Tapanuli orangutan is distinct from its cousins living in the rainforests of Borneo (Pongo pygmaeus) and elsewhere in Sumatra (Pongo abelii), they argued.Around the same time, Laurance and his colleagues had created detailed maps of the road network across northern Sumatra, including the forests of Batang Toru, part of a broader effort to map both infrastructure projects and targets for conservation across Southeast Asia. They decided to use those analyses to explore the impact the existing — and future — infrastructure developments might have on the Tapanuli orangutan.“It just seemed like an obvious thing to do,” Laurance told Mongabay.The estimated range of Pongo tapanuliensis in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, with the region’s legal forest-use designations and non-forest land covers. Image courtesy of Sloan et al., 2018.They found that planned developments pose a serious threat to this species’ survival, not to mention that of other animals such as the critically endangered Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae).The forests that are home to the Tapanuli orangutan are split into eastern and western “blocks,” along with the Lubuk Raya reserve, creating three isolated populations. What’s more, about 5 percent of the remaining numbers live in the Dolok Sibual Buali reserve, linked to the western block by a sliver of forest only about 700 meters (2,300 feet) wide.This corridor, as well as a sizeable chunk of the eastern block of habitat, have been zoned for oil palm and other types of agriculture, putting around 14 percent of the species’ total habitat in danger of development. Splitting the already-disjointed orangutan populations into smaller and smaller pieces will increase the chances of problems like inbreeding and accelerate the species’ slide toward extinction, the authors write.But the most pressing threat looming over these orangutans is a proposed 510-megawatt hydroelectric dam.“It’s right in the core habitat,” Laurance said.Land cleared as a staging area for the building of a new hydroelectric dam. Image courtesy of Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme.Based on the team’s analyses, they figure the project would dramatically change 96 square kilometers (37 square miles), or about 8 percent, of the animal’s range in the next four years. The dam’s construction would inevitably carry with it a suite of ancillary impacts, such as the access roads that crews will build and the pathways for power lines that they’ll have to carve through the forest. Such openings into the forest increase the odds that farmers will clear more land for agriculture or hunters will enter the area.Conversely, restoring forest at the proposed site of the dam would create a few narrow corridors that could reconnect the eastern and western populations and boost the species’ chances of survival, Laurance said.Despite these concerns, the project continues to move forward. Laurance said that he received confirmation that the World Bank has decided not to help fund the $1.6-billion project, likely because of the potential environmental damage. But the Bank of China has pledged financing for the dam, and a Chinese-state-owned hydroelectric company called Sinohydro has signed on to handle its construction.“It’s only about 510 megawatts. That’s not that much,” said Serge Wich, a primatologist at England’s Liverpool John Moores University, in an interview. “There are alternatives to get that energy.”Bornean (left), Sumatran (middle) and Tapanuli (right) male orangutans. Image by Eric Kilby, Aiwok and Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (GFDL).Wich was not involved in this research, but he was a coauthor of the paper announcing the new orangutan species in November.“There is so little time to protect this species,” he said. “The main value in this paper for us is that we can use it to further indicate what the main threats are and that there are still parts of their habitat need to be protected.”He urged the dam’s developers and representatives of the Indonesian government “to have a sensible discussion” about alternatives for generating power in this part of Sumatra. In the same vein, a growing cadre of scientists and conservation organizations, led by groups like the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme and the Sumatran Orangutan Society, are campaigning for a change in the project’s course.But if that doesn’t happen, the dam would be “the beginning of the end of this species,” Wich said.He said that little beyond the “extreme conservation” approached used in shepherding Africa’s mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) back from the brink of extinction, such as near-round-the-clock surveillance by armed guards, will keep the Tapanuli orangutan from disappearing forever.An adult female Tapanuli orangutan. Image by Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0).“Personally, I think it would be an enormous tragedy if we would lose a species for 510 megawatts,” he added. “That sounds absurd to me, but that seems [to be] where it’s heading if the government and company are not willing to change their path.”Laurance and his colleagues agree, arguing in the paper that the government should protect every bit of the animal’s remaining habitat without hesitation.“It’s not going to take a huge push to actually drive something like this to extinction,” he said. “It is absolutely time to pull out all the stops.”Banner image of an adult female Tapanuli orangutan by Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0). John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCITATIONSNater, A., Mattle-Greminger, M. P., Nurcahyo, A., Nowak, M. G., de Manuel, M., Desai, T., … & Lameira, A. R. (2017). Morphometric, behavioral, and genomic evidence for a new Orangutan species. Current Biology, 27(22), 3487-3498.Sloan, S., Supriatna, J., Campbell, M. J., Alamgir, M., & Laurance, W. F. (2018). Newly discovered orangutan species requires urgent habitat protection. Current Biology, 28:R1-R3.Editor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

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Kenya fall to Namibia in Africa Cup duel

first_imgThe result meant Kenya’s chances of reclaiming the trophy were reduced with Namibia taking control of the standings with two wins after beating Uganda 40-31in Kampala.It was a one way for Namibia in the first half where Kenya conceded six tries to see the hosts continue their dominance over Simbas who were seeking to revenge a 46-13 defeat they suffered last year at the same venue.Kenya were unable to retrieve the ball from kick off as Namibia pushed over from the line out but the Simbas defence did good to hold up.However, Namibia overpowered Kenya to force a scrum that led to the opener when the hosts turned over with a mauling try.Kenya 15s lining up against champions Namibia in their second match of the 2016 Africa Cup Division 1A in Windhoek. PHOTO/courtesy.Kenya were reduced to 14 men after Simon Muniafu was sent to the sin-bin and the hosts made good use of the opportunity to double the lead to see the visitors trail 14-0.The Simbas found themselves on the wrong side of the referee once again  when they were penalized for not rolling away at the ruck. Namibia opted for the line out just five meters from Kenya’s try line.They (Namibia) managed to setup a maul off the line out and push over for their third try that was converted by Cootzee Tiaan.Things went from bad to worse for Paarwater boys as the hosts added another try through Dino Wilson to take the scores at 28-0Kenya lost the ball in their scrum to see Namibia capitalize on it to go over twice for another converted tries, taking the tally to 40-0.The Simbas found their rhythm on the stroke of half time when Moses Amusala bumped off four Namibians as Kenya attempted to surge forward before it paid off with Adimo’s touchdown that was converted by Darwin Mukidza.Both sides scored two tries apiece in the second half with Kenya getting theirs from Dan Sikuta and Joseph Kang’ethe.Kenya will face Uganda in their next match on July 31 at Nairobi’s RFUEA Grounds.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000The Kenya 15s team posing for a team photo.PHOTO/KRUNAIROBI, Kenya, July 16 – The national rugby 15s team fell 56-21 to champions Namibia in their second match of Africa Cup Division1A played in Windhoek on Saturday.Namibia proved to be a hard nut to crack for the Kenya Simbas who only grounded only one converted try in the first half as the Jerome Paarwater charges found the going tough, just a week after walloping Zimbabwe 61-15 at their backyard in Harare.last_img read more

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Costa: “I almost joined Liverpool”

first_img0Shares0000LONDON, March 9- Red-hot Chelsea striker Diego Costa has claimed that he came close to joining Liverpool a year prior to swapping the Spanish capital for the one in England.The Spain international left Atletico Madrid in the off-season after helping them clinch the La Liga title on the final day in a dramatic finish to campaign. The Blues had been linked with his signature for quite some time, but they finally acquired his services after the World Cup, and Costa has thrived in England thus far, scoring 17 goals in just 19 league appearances.But the 26-year-old has now revealed that he almost chose Anfield as his next destination, after the Reds reportedly matched his release clause, before he decided to pen a contract extension at the Vicente Calderon.In quotes attributed to the Daily Mirror, he said: “I was close to leaving Atletico. Liverpool are a great team, but after fighting so hard and overcoming difficulties to get my place at Atletico, how could I leave?“I thought it was very important to keep growing with Atletico and to play there for many years.”As it turned out, Costa stayed in Madrid for just one more season after the west London outfit met his release clause.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Sense of victimhood unleashes evil intentions

first_img9. Boredom. Boredom is widely underrated as a source of evil. Yet, it most certainly is. Lack of purpose, not a lack of things to do, is the source of nearly all boredom. People need meaning in their lives. And if they don’t have it, they will pursue visceral excitement instead of meaning or seek meaning in evil causes. I believe there is a 10th explanation that is greater than all the others and is particularly widespread today. 10. Victimhood. A lifelong study of good and evil has led me to conclude that the greatest single cause of evil is people perceiving of themselves or their group as victims. Nazism arose from Germans’ sense of victimhood – as a result of the Versailles Treaty, of the “stab in the back” that led to Germany’s loss in World War I and of a world Jewish conspiracy. Communism was predicated on workers regarding themselves as victims of the bourgeoisie. Much of Islamic evil today emanates from a belief that the Muslim world has been victimized by Christians and Jews. Many prisoners, including those imprisoned for horrible crimes, regard themselves as victims of society or of their upbringing. The list of those attributing their evil acts to their being victims is as long as the list of evildoers. This is also true in the micro realm. Family members whose primary identity is that of victim usually feel entirely free to hurt others in the family. That is why psychotherapists who regularly reinforce the victim status of their patients do the patient and society great harm. If my belief is even partially correct, the preoccupation of much of America with telling whole groups that they are victims – of racism, sexism, homophobia, xenophobia and classism, among other American sins – can only increase cruelty and evil in America. Dennis Prager hosts a nationally syndicated radio talk show based in Los Angeles. He is the author of four books, most recently Happiness Is a Serious Problem. His Web site is www.pragerradio.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! 4. Religion. Religion is a popular culprit these days. And it is undeniable that religion can be a source of evil – it certainly is in the case of the true-believing Islamic terrorist. And it was in the wars over theology that wracked Europe for centuries. But two facts mitigate against regarding religion as the primary explanation for evil. One is that religion itself was often developed precisely in order to reduce human evil. Whatever evil individual Christians may have ever engaged in, it is hard to find advocacy of evil within Christian Scriptures. The other is that secular ideologies and regimes – Nazism and Communism, for example – have murdered and tortured far more people than any religion has. 5. Money. Money and greed are so widely regarded as causes of evil that the phrase “Money is the root of all evil” has become a cliche. And there is no doubt that people seeking what money can buy – luxury, status, women and excitement, to name but a few things – have engaged in much evil. But flawed human nature and a lack of self-control, not money per se, are the causes of evil in these instances. 6. Power. Like those driven by money, many who seek power will do anything, no matter how evil, to attain power. However, it is a relatively small number of people who seek such power and commit evil in its pursuit. 7. Pursuit of the good. The road to hell is indeed paved with good intentions. One should never underestimate the amount of evil caused by people thinking they were doing good. Far more evil has been perpetrated by idealistic people than by cynical criminals. 8. Sadism. There are people who simply enjoy seeing others in pain and inflicting it on them. But sadism accounts for few, if any, large-scale evils. It accounts for many individual acts of cruelty. Decent people have sought to identify the roots of evil since the first indecent person inflicted cruelty on an innocent person. And people have come up with one or more of nine explanations, most of which are indeed valid. 1. The Devil (or whatever name the devil goes by in any given culture). I do not believe in a devil, but when one observes the seemingly inexplicable cruelty engaged in by some people, it is understandable that people have attributed it to some evil being that has taken over that person. 2. Genes. The contemporary term for devil is “genes.” Just as with the devil, when we observe a person engaging in evil behavior for which we have no rational explanation, we speak of it as coming from the person’s genes. 3. Parents. After genes, parents have become another popular explanation for much evil. “How was he raised?” we wonder when we read about evildoers, especially those who deliberately hurt children. There is no question that parental upbringing has both good and ill effects on children. But there are too many bad people raised in homes that did not abuse them, and too many good people who were raised in awful homes to allow us to make parents the primary explanation for evil. last_img read more

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Do your part to avert future power outages

first_imgA big-screen television uses about one-third the electricity as central air conditioning. Did you turn off the TV and read a book instead? When nuclear power plants are discussed, do you reject the idea without considering next summer’s heat wave? Are you now reconsidering your opposition to having a power-generating plant in your fair city? Whenever Southern Californians fail to do our part to reduce energy demand during blistering summer days, we risk overloads on the power grid that can lead to sporadic power outages to thousands of people during triple-digit heat. Let’s give Edison and the DWP a break. They’re working double shifts trying to fix and upgrade transformers, and there’s no air conditioning on those poles. The weather has been this week’s hot topic. The heat wave caused at least 18 deaths in Los Angeles County and three-day power outages for thousands of customers. The list of possible heat wave-related deaths included a mentally ill Gardena woman, who was found dead in a board-and-care home over the weekend. Southern California Edison and Los Angeles Department of Water and Power officials had begged customers to turn up their air-conditioning thermostats to 78 degrees. They told us not to run major appliances during peak hours, use fans instead of air conditioning and, in short, not overburden the power grid. If you are coming inside from 103-degree heat, 78 degrees feels cool enough. You can sleep when the room temperature is 78 degrees. Did you turn your thermostat up to 78? Summers in Southern California can be brutal for a week or two. When it gets as hot as it has been for the past week, remind yourself to turn the thermostat up to 78, turn off the TV and appliances, including your computer. Ignore that advice, and the next three-day nightmare without electricity could be yours.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Blast kills 15 Pakistani soldiers

first_imgA security official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said that the blast was the work of a suicide bomber, adding that the bomber could have been one of the civilian workers at the brigade headquarters. “This is a high security zone,” the official said. “Obviously, this was someone who was known and familiar to the soldiers there and it could be one of the civilians working at the base.” Government officials would not publicly confirm that it was a suicide attack, however, and there were no immediate claims of responsibility. Maj. Gen. Waheed Arshad, the spokesman for the Pakistani military, said the cause of the explosion was still being investigated. The attack on the military installation coincided with a visit to Islamabad by the U.S. deputy secretary of state, John D. Negroponte, who met Thursday with Musharraf. Pakistan has been raked with surging violence as the military battles fighters sympathetic to the Taliban and al-Qaida, with a rising number of deadly attacks on military targets. ISLAMABAD, Pakistan – At least 15 soldiers from an elite commando unit were killed Thursday evening when a blast, apparently set off by a suicide bomber, tore through the dining hall of a military installation in northwestern Pakistan, military officials said. At least 27 soldiers were wounded; six were in critical condition. The soldiers killed belonged to a unit of Special Services Group, commonly known as commandos, of the Pakistani military. Pakistan’s president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, who is also the military chief, belongs to the SSG. The attack took place about 50 miles outside the capital, Islamabad, in the cantonment area of Tarbela Ghazi at the brigade headquarters of the Special Operation Task Force. The unit has been set up with American aid to flush out al-Qaida from the semiautonomous tribal areas straddling the border with Afghanistan. The attack on Thursday was the second time this month that a high-security installation had been hit, pointing to the ease with which terrorists have been able to inflict maximum damage after penetrating seemingly secure military areas. On Sept. 4, at least 25 people were killed when two suicide bombers blew themselves up in the garrison city of Rawalpindi. Many of the victims belonged to the country’s powerful intelligence agency, known as Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI. The blast on Thursday occurred around 8 p.m., as soldiers were having dinner in the mess hall, the military spokesman said. Afterward, security officials cordoned off the area and the wounded were ferried to the military hospital in nearby Attock and Rawalpindi.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Targeted slaying baffles West Hills victim’s family

first_img “He tried to avoid all of his (gang) friends. He didn’t want to be in that life. … I tried to push him in the right direction. I feel like I’ve failed him.” Anyone with information can call West Valley Area homicide detectives at (818) 374-7721. Josh Kleinbaum, (818) 713-3669 josh.kleinbaum@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88 “He was the sunshine of everybody’s life here,” Patricia Rocha, Muñoz’s cousin, said Monday. “He was sweet, lovable, always hugging me, always saying he loved me. The family will deeply, deeply miss him. We’ll never forget him.” The gunmen fired about 20 feet to 30 feet away from the car and fled on foot, but no witnesses provided descriptions, Swanston said. “They clearly targeted him,” he said. “Whether it was personal or whether it was some way connected to a gang, that’s one of the things we’re going to have to get to the bottom of.” Police believe Muñoz was a gang member, although Rocha said that’s not true. Many of his friends were gang members, but he was trying to avoid that lifestyle, she said. He had just started taking classes at the West Valley Occupational School to become an air-conditioning repairman, and he hoped to own a business someday. “When he was younger, he had friends that were involved in gangs,” Rocha said. “But he was trying to do the right thing. He was trying to straighten out his life. WEST HILLS – Abel Muñoz didn’t have much time for friends. School, his job at the West Hills Pavilions grocery store, his 8-year-old daughter and his pregnant fiancee were plenty, which was fine with his family, wanting him to stay out of trouble. On Saturday night, trouble found him anyway. Muñoz, 26, of Van Nuys walked out of Pavilions at 11 p.m., just after his shift ended, and got into his car. He never made it out of the parking lot. Two gunmen opened fire at the car as it drove through the lot in the 6500 block of Platt Avenue, blowing out the back window and driver’s-side window and hitting Muñoz several times, said Detective Rick Swanston of the Los Angeles Police Department. Muñoz later died at Northridge Hospital Medical Center. last_img read more

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$13.6 million pledged to worldwide Armenia telethon

first_imgGLENDALE – A telethon that briefly united the global diaspora of Armenians raised pledges of $13.6 million to build roads, schools and hospitals in their homeland. The 12-hour telethon Thursday included Armenian entertainers and originated from a studio in this Los Angeles suburb, which is home to the largest Armenian-American population in the country. The ninth annual Armenia Fund telethon included live TV spots and Webcasts from around the globe. “This is an incredible network of people that comes alive for a 12-hour period, all over the world,” said the fund’s chairwoman, Maria Mehranian. “There are people who might never meet, who might not even like each other if they did meet, but it’s so much fun to create this vehicle of unity. We have wanted unity for 11 centuries.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’The Glendale-based fund has raised $160 million in 15 years of existence.last_img read more

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Man United to fine Lukaku for going AWOL and training with Anderlecht

first_imgCFR Cluj vs Celtic (Wednesday, 7:00pm) – talkSPORT 2Pyunik vs Wolves (Thursday, 5:00pm) – talkSPORT 2FC Mitdjylland vs Rangers (Thursday, 7:00pm) – talkSPORT 2West Ham vs Manchester City (Saturday, 12:30pm) – talkSPORTLeeds vs Nottingham Forest (Saturday, 12:30pm) – talkSPORT 2Crystal Palace vs Everton (Saturday, 3pm) – talkSPORT 2Tottenham vs Aston Villa (Saturday, 5:30pm) – talkSPORT The transfer window in England closes on Thursday at 5pm, but many other European clubs can continue trading players until September 2.It is understood Lukaku’s agent is in London attempting to get his exit to Italy over the line.With Lukaku being linked elsewhere, United are understood to be targeting former Tottenham striker Fernando Llorente, who is currently a free agent.Saturday is GameDay on talkSPORT and talkSPORT 2 as we become your go to destination for all the Premier League action. We’ll bring you LIVE commentary of Premier League games across all three time slots on Saturday – 12.30pm, 3pm and 5.30pm – delivering award-winning coverage to more GameDay listeners than ever. 1 Getty Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:11Loaded: 7.54%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:11 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti LIVE on talkSPORT Check out all the live commentaries coming up across the talkSPORT network this week Chelsea confident of beating Man United and Liverpool to Sancho signing Romelu Lukaku joined United in 2017 but appears ready for a new challenge elsewhere Tottenham line up bid for West Ham star who was labelled a ‘monster’ by Mourinho LATEST TRANSFER NEWS Kevin De Bruyne ‘loves Man City and wants to keep winning’, reveals father Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Liverpool’s signings under Michael Edwards – will Minamino be the next big hit? center_img TOP WORK targets moving on LIVING THE DREAM target LATEST Wantaway Manchester United striker Romelu Lukaku is expected to be fined by the club for missing training without permission.Lukaku, 26, wants a move away from Old Trafford this summer with Serie A giants Inter Milan and Juventus understood to be interested in him. And seemingly in an attempt to force through his move to Italy, Lukaku trained with his former team Anderlecht for the past two days.Although Monday was a day off for United’s players, he was expected back on Tuesday but remained in Belgium.Lukaku has not featured in any United’s pre-season matches, citing injury as the reason for his continued absence.He joined from Everton for an initial £75m in July 2017 and scored 12 league goals last season. Inter had a £54million bid for the Belgian rejected by United last month.Antonio Conte, the Inter manager, has previously suggested Lukaku is a target, saying: “I consider him a player who could improve our team.”Lukaku looked set to join Juve in a deal that would see Paulo Dybala go the other way last week.However, United pulled the plug on their attempts to sign the Argentine over the weekend as they were reportedly put off by his lack of enthusiasm to the move and his high wage demands. three-way race targets Martin Lipton has his say on Man United’s transfer policy Latest transfer news and gossip LIVE Cavani ‘agrees’ to join new club and will complete free transfer next summer last_img read more

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Daniel Levy talks about drug gang growing cannabis in warehouse owned by Spurs

first_img Getty Images – Getty Daniel Levy made the astonishing revelation about Spurs’ drug gang problem 2 In a new book titled Destination Tottenham, Levy revealed the process began in 2001 and there was an incident involving three acres of cannabis with one of their warehouses.“We discovered it had been bolted shut from the inside and when we finally got in we found three acres of cannabis growing in there,” Levy said to The Evening Standard. “We obviously had to call the police.“The next thing we knew we were victims of a revenge attack when the water pipes on the properties we owned down the High Road were cut, which flooded them all.”The venue is still called the ‘Tottenham Hotspur Stadium’, meaning there is an untapped source of revenue still to be plugged. Tottenham Hotspur chairman Daniel Levy has revealed a warehouse owned by the club was broken into and turned into a drugs factory.Levy helped the north London club complete their move into a brand new £1billion stadium earlier this year after years of planning and renovating.However, the project was beset with problems and delays including critical faults with the sprinklers and smoke alarm systems. The Spurs stadium cost £1billion to build and was finally opened earlier this year 2 Getty Images – Getty However, Levy admitted he would not rush into a deal just for the sake of appeasing the corporate bigwigs.“We are only going to do a naming rights deal if we get the right brand, in the right sector, on the right money,” said Levy. “If we can’t meet those three criteria, we won’t do it.“At the moment, we haven’t found a company that meets all three criteria.“We are not really close to anything on that at the moment.”last_img read more

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