Aging peacefully, Forest Lawn fetes centennial

first_imgGLENDALE – Forest Lawn Memorial Park celebrates its centennial this year, a sprawling monument designed to be much more than a cemetery. Today, people stroll through the “great park, towering trees, sweeping lawns, splashing fountains, singing birds, beautiful statuary” envisioned nearly a century ago by Forest Lawn founder Hubert Eaton. “It’s the place you come to remember,” said John Warren, Forest Lawn’s senior vice president of marketing. “You’re remembering your loved ones. You’re remembering the life of the person you loved.” Forest Lawn holds a yearlong celebration with exhibitions, retrospectives and events to mark 100 years. The “100 Years of Art and Design: Art and Architecture of Forest Lawn” exhibit opened Jan. 28 at the Forest Lawn Museum in Glendale, the oldest of the chain’s cemeteries, and runs through July 16. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant “For a cemetery group to last this long is quite an achievement,” said Kevin Flanagan, a spokesman for the state Consumer Affairs Department, which regulates private cemeteries. “To last this long and still remain so well-maintained is quite an achievement and a credit to the company.” Paula Miller recalls frolicking at Forest Lawn on Sundays as a kid. “I thought it was a park,” said Miller, 55, of La Caada Flintridge, who brought flowers this week to the grave of her father, Paul Emmanuel Kenagy, who died a year ago at 80. His gravemarker is etched with golf clubs and a ball, a tribute to his favorite pastime. “It’s a really nice feeling once you get in here actually. It’s not a depressing place.” Kenagy’s wife and Miller’s mother, Helen, 79, has visited her husband’s grave, which sits under an oak tree, four times over the last year. “I think it’s beautiful,” she said. “When you come, you don’t feel like it’s a depressing place because it’s so pretty and it’s very peaceful. He is probably up there wishing he had a tee time.” Unlike European cemeteries, where over time bodies are disinterred and cremated to save space, Forest Lawn and other American cemeteries have to plan ahead to make sure they have enough land to accommodate the dead. Forest Lawn has enough space at its Southern California venues to accept new burials for 70 years, Warren said. At some point, though, the company will have to make a change. “It’s no science,” Warren said. “There is only a finite amount of property available. … You could go vertical with wall crypts and a mausoleum. Another option is find more land and buy more property.” Finding affordable real estate in the Los Angeles area could be a challenge, and nobody wants to live next to a cemetery, so “nimbyism” could become an issue, as well. “Ultimately, we will run out of space for cemeteries,” Warren said. “But that’s a long way out.” In the meantime, people can still come to a beautiful place to remember their loved ones. “It is much more than a cemetery,” Warren said. “It’s a serene place. It’s a place to just relax. It’s an oasis in the city. When you’re in the park, you really forget that you’re in the hustle and bustle of Los Angeles.” !dtpo st!Jason Kandel, (818) 546-3306 jason.kandel@dailynews.com PLEASE BOX: A centennial open house will be held, 1 to 3 p.m. today, at Forest Lawn-Hollywood Hills, 6300 Forest Lawn Drive. Other centennial events will be held throughout the year. For information, call (800) 204-3131. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Terry: ‘It’s the toughest decision of my life, but it’s time for new challenge’

first_imgBournemouth are in pole position to land Chelsea captain John Terry who has confirmed he is looking for a new challenge.The Cherries are confident they can be the club to offer Terry one final extension to his Premier League career with the promise of regular first-team football, according to the Daily Mail.  Terry’s illustrious 22-year association with the club will end this summer, with at least 14 major trophies to his name and, potentially two more with league and Cup honours still to play for. Chelsea first announced the news of his departure on Monday and Terry has now posted a message to his fans on his Instagram account.Terry said: “It’s with overwhelming emotion that earlier this week the club and I announced this will be my last season as a Chelsea player.“This has been the toughest decision of my life for me and my family, but I always envisaged leaving on the right terms, in the right way and at the right time – and it is now.“I feel I still have regular football in me but understand opportunities here at Chelsea will be limited, it is therefore time for a new challenge.He added: “I’ll never be able to put into words the love I have for you fans. The support you have always given me, both personally and to the team, is phenomenal.“You’ve been instrumental in my success and have inspired me and the team to win so many trophies.” 1 Terry has called time on his 22-year association with Chelsea and will leave this summer last_img read more

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How Inter Milan could look under Conte with Lukaku and Moses – but no Icardi

first_img buildlineup.com Antonio Conte won the Premier League and FA Cup at Chelsea Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Victor Moses is currently on loan at Fenerbahce Man United transfer news live: Haaland ‘wants a change’, two players off in January REVEALED Getty Images – Getty huge blow Samir Handanovic has been Inter’s first-choice goalkeeper since 2012 and that is not expected to change under Conte.But the veteran stopper is likely to have a back-three in front of him with Conte known to favour a 3-4-3 formation, which brought him Premier League and FA Cup glory at Chelsea.Earlier this month, Diego Godin announced he will be leaving Atletico Madrid this summer, and has been heavily linked with Inter.He could be in a solid-looking back-three alongside Milan Skriniar and Stefan de Vrij.Moses, whose 18-month loan with Fenerbahce would have to be cut short in order to move to the San Siro, would slot in at right-wing-back, a position he starred in under Conte at Stamford Bridge. LATEST FOOTBALL NEWS Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move Kwadwo Asamoah would be an obvious candidate at left-wing-back after playing there during his Juventus days.Radja Nainggolan and Marcelo Brozovic could feature in the middle of the park as their work-rate and energy would suit Conte’s style of play.Lautaro Martinez, who has had an impressive debut season at the San Siro which resulted in an Argentina call-up for the Copa America, could be shifted out wide to accommodate Lukaku.Meanwhile, Perisic, whose future with Inter remains uncertain, would play in his preferred left wing position, if he stays. Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars LATEST 4 Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won Getty Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Green reveals how he confronted Sarri after Chelsea’s 6-0 defeat at Man City center_img no dice gameday cracker Romelu Lukaku has been in and out of Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s starting XI Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ Inter Milan are set for a summer of change.Luciano Spalletti two-year spell as manager is expected to come to an end as former Chelsea boss Antonio Conte waits in the wings.  shining deals Conte has been out of work since being sacked by the Blues last summer, but is set to replace Spalletti.Manchester United striker Romelu Lukaku, who the Italian tried to sign at Chelsea in 2017, is reportedly his top transfer target, along with Stamford Bridge outcast Victor Moses. Moses featured prominently during Conte’s two seasons in west London, and played a crucial role in the club’s Premier League title win in the 2016/17 season. 4 4 REPLY 4 ADVICE Inter’s team next season could push Juventus all the way in the race for the Serie A crown Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury tense Getty With Conte understood to be targeting Lukaku, it could spell the end for Inter star Mauro Icardi, who has been linked with a move to Juventus.Inter are fourth in Serie A with one game to go and are battling Atalanta and AC Milan for Champions League football.However, under Conte, the club could mount a long-awaited title challenge, but how will they line up? talkSPORT.com takes a look.last_img read more

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Care to bake a cake or support Adam’s sweet fundraiser?

first_imgA cake sale is being organised this weekend to raise funds for Adam Mc Donnell, a much-loved Letterkenny boy who requires specialist care.Adam is a five-year-old boy who has quadriplegic cerebral palsy, which means he is unable to walk, crawl, sit, hold objects or even hold his head up.He has uncontrollable epilepsy and aspiration lung disease and requires round the clock care. He is peg fed, non-verbal and deaf in his left ear. James and Adam Mc DonnellAdam has the love and support of his parents Rachel and Neil McDonnell and older brother James (8). Adam’s mother Rachel said he is a happy child despite all his difficulties: “He loves playing with his big brother James and really enjoys going to playschool. He loves being outside and especially enjoys watching the birds!”James, Adam and RachelAn online and community fundraiser was established to help pay for continued therapy, specialised equipment and toys for Adam.A bake sale will be held to raise funds this weekend. A wide selection of treats will be available after Masses on Saturday 24th and Sunday 25th June in the Church Of The Irish Martyrs in Letterkenny. Anybody who can bake or would like to donate their time, money or help in any way is welcome to get involved, says organiser and family friend Marie Hayes “If anyone can bake anything that would be amazing, I can pick it up on Friday or I’ll literally go to Timbucktoo to get anything,” she said.People are welcome to leave baked goods at the  Church Of The Irish Martyrs after 5.30pm on Saturday, or they can contact Marie on Facebook here (CLICK HERE)All support is greatly appreciated. If you would like to donate to Adam’s Just Giving page, click here: www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/adams-page  Care to bake a cake or support Adam’s sweet fundraiser? was last modified: June 21st, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:adam mc donnellcake salefundraiserlast_img read more

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Donegal councillor fails to join legal challenge over RTE broadcast

first_imgThe High Court has refused a county councillor John O’Donnell’s application to be allowed to be part of a legal challenge by another councillor over an ethics inquiry.The Standards in Public Office (SiPO) Commission is investigating whether three councillors breached ethics when they were the subject of an RTE Investigates television programme.In it, an undercover researcher posed as a representative of a foreign investment firm looking for their support for a wind farm development. SiPO is conducting three separate inquiries against Councillors Hugh McElvaney from Monaghan, John O’Donnell from Donegal and Joe Queenan from Sligo.Cllr McElveaney brought High Court judicial review proceedings last year claiming the inquiry into him should be stopped.He said SiPO has failed to discharge its functions adequately under law by failing to carry out a preliminary inquiry into a complaint against him which was made by his own council’s cathaoirleach and CEO.Among the claims of the former FG, now independent Cllr McElvaney, was that he was entrapped by the RTE researcher. The SiPO inquiry is on hold pending the High Court case.Cllr O’Donnell then sought to be joined as a notice party in Cllr McElvaney’s proceedings because, he claims, he would be affected by the outcome of the case and has a “vital interest” in it.SiPO opposed Cllr O’Donnell’s application.Now breakingnews.ie has reported that Mr Justice Michael McGrath ruled he had not satisfied the required legal test to be joined to the proceedings.He believed Cllr O’Donnell’s application might more properly be viewed as being motivated by a desire to assist and support the claim being brought by Cllr McElvaney. With that would perhaps be the hope that a positive outcome for Cllr Elvaney might influence the course of SiPO’s investigation of Cllr O’Donnell or the view SiPO might take in relation to it, he said.He did not see how either a successful or unsuccessful challenge by Cllr McElvaney could be said to have a direct effect on Cllr O’Donnell’s rights and/or obligations as that term has been previously interpreted by the courts.Donegal councillor fails to join legal challenge over RTE broadcast was last modified: March 1st, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:challengeCllr John O’DonnelldonegalHIGH COURTkilmacrennanSIPOlast_img read more

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Inside the ORC-Opioid Connection

first_imgQuiz an LP investigator about trends in ORC, and it’s nearly certain that he or she will mention the opioid crisis, the fact that drug addiction is a catalyst for a growing number of professional shoplifters. But does it matter? So what if a thief is stealing to get money to score drugs rather than pure profit? What, if any, are the implications for retail, loss prevention, and security strategy?Walter PalmerAt first, Walter Palmer CFI, CFE, said he wasn’t sure it did matter. After all, drug addiction has always been a driver of store theft. But his attitude changed as Palmer, executive vice president at CAP Index, began to see retailers take an increasing amount of heat for the opioid crisis. “We’ve received a lot of criticism, almost that we’re enablers of the opioid crisis, that we’re turning a blind eye to return fraud that’s fueling the crisis.”The criticism is unfair, said Palmer—who moderated the “Shoplifters, ORC, Shrinking Justice & Opioids: What’s a Retailer to Do?” session at the Retail Industry Leader Association’s 2018 Retail Asset Protection Conference—firstly because retailers are not the cause but the primary victims of addicts’ theft and additionally because retailers have made some significant shifts in return policies. Several major retailers have significantly tightened return policies to help eliminate the secondary market for cards, he noted, and have even gone so far as to associate nonreceipted returns with customer drivers’ licenses.- Sponsor – At the same time, retailers must still do right by their legitimate customers and are quick to draw fire if policies are judged too restrictive. “That’s when I really got interested. I thought, ‘Wow, this is tough,’” said Palmer. He added that while retailers draw criticism for perceived lax return policies, they don’t earn praise for all the measures and programs, such as medication disposal programs, that they do have and that go above and beyond what they’re required to do.How Retailers Can Address the Opioid Crisis On an industry level, then, the opioid issue has relevance for retailers. It suggests a need to promote how they are providing assistance to fight the crisis and fighting back against the suggestion that they’re somehow to blame for it.It also reinforces the importance of private-public partnerships to share information and to educate one another, according to Detective First Lieutenant James Grady in the Michigan State Police (MSP) fraud investigation section. Via MSP participation in the Michigan Regional Organized Crime Association, Grady says he’s heard firsthand from retailers about the impact of opioids on ORC and seen efforts by retailers to curb related fraud. “Those working groups have been vital to establishing relationships. But I’m a firm advocate that there is always room for improvement,” he said. But how about at the store level? Are there are implications here as well? Yes, according to several LP executives.ORC surveys conducted by the National Retail Federation have tracked an increase in violence associated with store theft that goes hand-in-hand with the growing number of professional shoplifters driven by the desperate need to ‘get well,’ suggested Brendan “Ben” Dugan, CFI, ORC and corporate investigator at CVS Heath. As a guest in February on CrimeScience, a bi-weekly podcast by the Loss Prevention Research Council (LPRC), he said addicted offenders have a higher propensity for violence compared to other professional shoplifters and added that it’s not uncommon for them to be in possession of drugs or paraphernalia that enhances an already heightened desperation to escape if apprehended. LPRC director and podcast cohost Read Hayes, PhD, added that addicts could also be aggressive for pharmacological reasons, from sleep deprivation, or out of a desperate a need to settle debts. “There are so many angles,” he said. Listen to the podcast.Ben Dugan, ORC investigator at CVS Health (left), and Read Hayes of the LPRC discuss the effects of the opioid crisis on retail crime.The obvious upshot for LP executives is to ensure that policies and training are sufficient to protect store teams and customers in light of the threat, which may also warrant some less-apparent store-security measures. For example, Hayes noted that pharmacies in retail drug stores may need to consider how certificates are displayed so that pharmacists can’t be identified and put at personal risk by addicts angered at a refusal to fill a fake prescription. Another risk to consider, especially for stores with pharmacy operations, is the heightened likelihood of drug overdoses on premises, said Palmer.LP teams might also revisit where to implement heightened security measures as the crisis raises the risk of violence beyond city centers. “A lot of stores that are located out in the suburbs…are having to deal with something they’ve never had to deal with before,” said Dugan. “People who have been afflicted with this addiction are targeting our stores in those neighborhoods, which we’ve never seen before.” He added that it’s helpful to evaluate addiction as a possible motive during interviews as it can inform the most effective strategy for conducting them.LP executives might also find it worthwhile to assess if incidents involving addicts are being correctly regarded and investigated as ORC, according to an investigator for a national retail chain in an interview with LP Magazine. “Retailers have had to reeducate some of their in-store AP teams to not dismiss their incidents due to the fact that drug users are the ones taking the product. They can be quick to say that they’re just being hit by drug users and are not thinking about the next level fence that is driving the demand,” he said. “ORC has many levels and layers, and loss prevention teams need to be reminded that when someone steals high-demand product that is not for personal use, there is usually a level of ORC involved.”Finally, while product protection strategy may not vary depending on the motive of professional shoplifters, identification of offenders may. Dugan said that the addict-shoplifter, because of his or her need to address a daily habit, tends to be more predictable and less strategic than a traditional booster counterpart. This fact can raise the value of predictive analytics and point-of-sale data for more timely identification of offenders.  Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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Online university leads United States in awarding doctorates to blacks

first_imgKitty and Abdulla Warsame celebrate the Walden doctorate she earned in 2011. Black students also make up a growing percentage of Walden’s overall enrollment, which last fall stood at 52,000. Although the university doesn’t collect racial data, NSF reports that one-third of the 562 doctoral degrees Walden awarded in 2015 went to black students. That share is more than double what it was in 2011, and triple the percentage in 1993. An online program also reduces the odds that racial or demographic stereotyping will influence outcomes, says Harper, who is white. “I have no clue how many [students] were minorities, or anything else about them,” she says about the 28 students she advised but never met. She knows Kitty only because Warsame sought her out after learning they both lived in the Houston area.Although the Walden degree gave Warsame entrée into academia, she says many of her colleagues at Morehead State were scornful of her credentials. “They had a difficult time accepting anyone with an online degree,” she says. “Anything new was seen as a threat to the status quo.” Prairie View was no better, she adds. “I think it will take a generation for attitudes to change,” she predicts. (Data) National Science Foundation Walden doctorates by field (1990–2015) Social sciences, health, and education are the most popular degrees. (Graphic) David Malakoff/Science; (Data) National Science Foundation An online, for-profit university is doing something that has long eluded brick-and-mortar institutions in the United States: awarding advanced degrees to significant numbers of black students.New data from the latest Survey of Earned Doctorates by the National Science Foundation (NSF) document how Walden University, which has its academic headquarters in Minneapolis, Minnesota, is far outpacing every other U.S. university in serving this population. At the same time, Walden’s success won’t improve faculty diversity, one of the holy grails of U.S. higher education, until traditional brick-and-mortar institutions become more accepting of online degrees.Founded in 1970, Walden ranks first by a wide margin among all U.S. universities in doctoral degrees awarded to black students, NSF reports. Its total of 682 degrees from 2011 through 2015 is nearly twice the number awarded by second-place Howard University, a historically black university in Washington, D.C. Every other university lags far behind. Walden’s 5-year total is six times the number awarded by such large state institutions as the University of Illinois in Urbana, and Michigan State University in East Lansing.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Walden’s growing impact on diversity Online university awards more doctorates to blacks than any other U.S. university.  A growing share of black doctorates One third of Walden University’s doctorates are now awarded to blacks. By Jeffrey MervisFeb. 17, 2017 , 3:00 PM Warsame recently left Prairie View and will soon be working as an adjunct at the University of Houston in Victoria, Texas. “I didn’t need the headache of a full-time faculty position,” she says. “And this will give me a chance to return to my first love, working with undergraduates on how to become better classroom teachers.”Despite the hostility she faced, Warsame has no regrets about earning her degrees online. “I’m 100% confident about my ability to teach my students what they need to know,” she says.That’s no idle boast, Harper says. “Kitty was nominated by her dean for a chancellor’s teaching award after her first year at Prairie View,” she notes. “But we couldn’t let her have it because she hadn’t been there long enough.”Kitty credits Walden for giving her the skills she needed to succeed. And she has returned the favor by being an unpaid advocate for its brand of education.“I love Walden, and I’ve encouraged several people to go there, including my husband,” she says. “I’m their best advertisement, and they don’t even know it.” Courtesy of Kitty Warsame Online university leads United States in awarding doctorates to blacks (Data) National Science Foundation Top 20 schools for black doctorates Walden is far ahead of the pack in the number of doctorates awarded to black students from 2011 through 2015.  Chasing a dreamThe married couple, who are both black, had already enjoyed successful careers—she as a teacher in public and private elementary and secondary schools, he as a chemical engineer for oil and gas countries around the world—when they decided separately that their next career would be as a university faculty member. Both had the same goal, namely, to share their real-world work experiences with undergraduates studying to enter those fields.To do that meant going back to school. However, the traditional colleges they had attended in the 1980s no longer fit into their busy lives. As adult learners with family responsibilities and full-time jobs—his involving extensive travel—the couple needed to call the shots on where, when, and how they could earn their graduate degrees.Kitty, now 61, had become enamored with Walden while earning her master’s degree in early childhood reading and literacy more than a decade ago. “You can immediately take what you’re learning and use it in the classroom,” she says. “It was the most useful degree ever.”That positive experience convinced her to stick with Walden for her Ed.D. in educational leadership. Her doctoral program required one 3-day residency, she recalls. The rest of the work, both courses and her dissertation, was done online.The arrangement meshed well with her personal life. “I was teaching full time and had young children, and my husband was out of the country for his job,” she says. “I could never have done it at a traditional brick-and-mortar institution.” Walden was considerably more expensive than other online programs, Kitty notes. But she was willing to pay it for what she felt was a higher quality education.Morehead State University in Kentucky hired her immediately after she graduated in 2009. In 2012 she was recruited into a tenure-track position by Prairie View A&M University in Texas, where she got rave student reviews and was promoted to interim chair for curriculum and instruction, the biggest department in its College of Education. Thanks to that growth, Walden now trains a significant fraction of all black students earning U.S. doctoral degrees. Its 2015 graduating class contains one-twelfth of the nation’s 2281 black recipients of doctoral degrees at U.S. universities that year. As recently as 2002, Walden trained fewer than one in 100.Walden’s success is buried within NSF’s 2015 survey, an annual census of every U.S. doctoral recipient that contains a trove of information on this specialized workforce. But Walden is no secret to Kitty and Abdulla Warsame. (Graphic) David Malakoff/Science; (Data) National Science Foundation Abdulla enrolled at Walden just as Kitty was finishing her degree. Born and raised in Somalia, he had come to the University of Kentucky in 1982 to earn both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees. That’s where they met and married, and in 1992 he became a U.S. citizen.Since then he has worked around the world—Qatar, Angola, and Equatorial Guinea—as well as in Kentucky and Houston, Texas. The demands of his job slowed his progress toward his Ed.D. But in December 2016 he was laid off, and this spring he hopes to finish his degree and, at 62, make the jump into academia.“There’s a big gap between education and practice in engineering,” he says. “Many professors are engineers by degree but not by practice. I had one professor at Kentucky with industry experience, and he saw things from a different angle.”Abdulla says he wouldn’t have any trouble finding another position in the energy industry. “Chemical engineers are in high demand,” he says. But he’d rather work upstream, trying to improve the quality of the engineering workforce. “I was always mentoring new employees on the job,” he says. “So now I’m hoping for a chance to do it on a larger scale, before they get their first job.”The Warsames epitomize the type of nontraditional student that Walden serves. They tend to be older, working full-time jobs, and about 85% are pursuing graduate degrees, including a range of Ph.D.s, Ed.D.s, and professional degrees. They are also more likely to be female, come from a racial or ethnic minority, and be the first in their generation to attend college than graduate students at other U.S. institutions, according to a recent Gallup study Walden commissioned. That’s not the pedigree of the traditional academic researcher in the United States.Some 58% of the 1135 doctoral degrees Walden awarded between 1990 and 2015 fall within NSF’s definition of science and engineering (S&E). That large number means Walden has the potential to contribute to NSF’s decades-long quest to increase participation by underrepresented minorities—Hispanics, Native Americans, and those with disabilities as well as blacks—in academic science.The largest S&E subgroup at Walden is the social sciences and psychology, with 28% of the total. Next, at 25%, are doctoral degrees that NSF defines as the health sciences. (Only a tiny slice of Walden doctoral degrees are awarded in biology, mathematics, and the physical sciences.) Education is the largest field in the non-S&E doctoral category, comprising 19% of the total degrees awarded.Walden’s recipeMost of Walden’s students are practitioners. But that doesn’t mean they are getting a watered-down doctoral degree, says Irma Harper, assistant vice chancellor for the Texas A&M University system (TAMUS) in Houston. For a decade Harper was also a faculty member at Walden, and she chaired Kitty Warsame’s dissertation committee.“An online program has to be well-organized and structured, and Walden does that very well, probably better than we do,” says Harper, who in a previous job at TAMUS oversaw distance learning for the 11-campus system, which includes Prairie View. “I think the rigor of Walden stands up to any university program in my field” of education leadership, she adds.Self-selection may play a role in the quality of Walden’s graduate programs, Harper speculates. “It takes a certain type of student, someone who is independent and focused on what they want,” she says. “Students who need the face-to-face mentoring that a traditional program can offer don’t stay. Kitty was driven to succeed, and she excelled.”last_img read more

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Trump criticisms spark more protests at NFL games

first_imgArgentine bishop appears at court hearing on abuse charges Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Trump to designate Mexican drug cartels as terrorist groups Defensive star Von Miller was among the large group of Denver Broncos who took a knee in Buffalo Sunday, where Bills running back LeSean McCoy stretched during the anthem.“We felt like President Trump’s speech was an assault on our most cherished right, freedom of speech,” said Miller, who normally steers clear of politics and social issues.Dozens of more players protested before the Raiders-Redskins game, the final one of the day and not far from the White House in Landover, Maryland. All but a handful of Raiders sat on their bench and seven Redskins took a knee while their teammates stood arm-in-arm along with owner Dan Snyder and president Bruce Allen.In Chicago, the Pittsburgh Steelers stayed in the tunnel except for one player, Army veteran Alejandro Villanueva, who stood outside with a hand over his heart. Both the Seahawks and Titans stayed inside until after the national anthem was over in Nashville, a throwback to the pre-2009 NFL when teams, not the league, set pre-game policy regarding players standing on the sideline for the anthem.A handful of NFL players had been continuing Kaepernick’s protest this season, but that ballooned Sunday following Trump’s two-day weekend rant. It began with the president calling for NFL protesters to be fired and continued Saturday when he rescinded a White House invitation for the NBA champion Golden State Warriors over star Stephen Curry’s criticism.The president’s delving into the NFL protests started by Kaepernickbrought new attention and angered many players who took one insult as a personal attack on their mothers.“Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, you’d say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He’s fired,’” Trump said to loud applause Friday night at a rally in Huntsville, Alabama.“I’m a son of a queen,” Falcons defensive lineman Grady Jarrett said.Super Bowl MVP Tom Brady was among the New England Patriots who locked arms in solidarity in Foxborough, Massachusetts. Aaron Rodgers did the same with his teammates in Green Bay.“Standing with locked arms is good, kneeling is not acceptable. Bad ratings!” Trump tweeted Sunday. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Kenya loses hosting rights to African soccer tournament LATEST STORIES No more menthol cigarettes: New ban on tobacco, vape flavors View comments The NFL and its players, often at odds, used Sunday’s anthems to show unity. One of Trump’s biggest supporters in the NFL, Patriots owner Robert Kraft, joined the chorus when he expressed “deep disappointment” with Trump.“I like Bob very much. He’s my friend. He gave me a Super Bowl ring a month ago. So he’s a good friend of mine and I want him to do what he wants to do,” Trump said. “… We have great people representing our country, especially our soldiers our first responders and they should be treated with respect.“And when you get on your knee and you don’t respect the American flag or the anthem.”The protests started more than a year ago when former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refused to stand during the anthem as a protest of police treatment of minorities. This season, no team has signed him, and some supporters believe NFL owners are avoiding him because of the controversy.A handful of white players didn’t stand Sunday, but the vast majority of those actively protesting were black.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ In Detroit, anthem singer Rico Lavelle took a knee at the word “brave,” lowering his head and raising his right fist. In Nashville, anthem singer Meghan Linsey, took a knee as she finished singing.Jets Chairman and CEO Christopher Johnson, whose brother, Woody, is the ambassador to England and one of Trump’s most ardent supporters, called it “an honor and a privilege to stand arm-in-arm unified with our players during today’s national anthem” in East Rutherford, New Jersey.The issue reverberated across the Atlantic, where about two dozen players took a knee during the playing of the U.S. anthem at Wembley Stadium.“We stand with our brothers,” Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs said. “They have the right and we knelt with them today. To protest, non-violent protest, is as American as it gets, so we knelt with them today to let them know that we’re a unified front.”Jaguars owner Shad Khan and players on both teams who were not kneeling remained locked arm-in-arm throughout the playing of the anthem and “God Save The Queen.” No players knelt during the British anthem.“Me taking a knee doesn’t change the fact that I support our military, I’m a patriot and I love my country,” Bills linebacker Lorenzo Alexander said. “But I also recognize there are some social injustices in this country and today I wanted to take a knee in support of my brothers who have been doing it.”Alexander said he’ll go back to standing for the anthem next week.“I just wanted to show them that I was with them today, especially in the backdrop of our president making the comments about our players, about their mothers,” Alexander said. “And then you put that in conjunction with how he tried to gray-area Nazism and KKK members as being fine people, I had to take a knee.”The National Hockey League’s reigning champion Pittsburgh Penguins announced Sunday they’ve accepted a White House invitation from Trump. The Penguins said they respect the office of the president and “the long tradition of championship team visiting the White House.”Before Game 1 of the WNBA Finals in Minneapolis on Sunday, the Los Angeles Sparks left the floor while the Minnesota Lynx stood arm-in-arm. The Sparks returned to a chorus of boos when the song was finished. Trump also mocked the league’s crackdown on illegal hits, suggesting the league had softened because of its safety initiatives.Kahn, who was among the NFL owners who chipped in $1 million to the Trump inauguration committee, said he met with his team captains before kickoff in London “to express my support for them, all NFL players and the league following the divisive and contentious remarks made by President Trump.”Among the strongest criticisms of the president Sunday was this from Saints coach Sean Payton: “I’m disappointed in the comments that were made. I think we need a little bit more wisdom in that office,” he said of the White House. “I want that guy to be one of the smarter guys in the room and it seems like every time he’s opening up his mouth it’s something that is dividing our country and not pulling us together.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Most NFL players on Sunday locked arms with their teammates — some standing, others kneeling — in a show of solidarity. A handful of teams stayed off the field until after “The Star-Spangled Banner” to avoid the issue altogether.As he prepared to board Air Force One to return to Washington from New Jersey, Trump said the players protesting the anthem were “very disrespectful to our country” and called again on owners to stop what he considers unpatriotic displays in America’s most popular sport.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“This has nothing to do with race,” Trump said. “This has to do with respect for our country.”The president’s attack on athletes turned the anthems — usually sung during commercials — into must-watch television shown live by the networks and Yahoo!, which streamed the game in London. In some NFL stadiums, crowds booed or yelled at players to stand. There was also some applause. Winter storm threatens to scramble Thanksgiving travel plans The Pittsburgh Steelers side of the field is nearly empty during the playing of the national anthem before an NFL football game between the Steelers and Chicago Bears, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Chicago.President Donald Trump’s criticism of players who kneel during the national anthem sparked angry protests around the National Football League Sunday, as about 200 players sat, knelt or raised their fists in defiance.A week ago, just six players protested.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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